Summary of Skills

Age 10-12 - Concept 3: Change

Unit 1: Matter [S]

Science

  • Calculate density to identify an unknown substance.
  • Classify matter based on physical properties including magnetism.
  • Classify matter based on physical properties including mass.
  • Classify matter based on physical properties including physical state (solid, liquid, and gas).
  • Classify matter based on physical properties including relative density (sinking and floating).
  • Classify matter based on physical properties including solubility in water.
  • Classify matter based on physical properties including the ability to conduct or insulate electric energy.
  • Classify matter based on physical properties including the ability to conduct or insulate thermal energy.
  • Compare metals, nonmetals, and metalloids using physical properties such as luster, conductivity, or malleability.
  • Conduct tests, compare data, and draw conclusions about physical properties of matter including conduction.
  • Conduct tests, compare data, and draw conclusions about physical properties of matter including density and buoyancy. Classify matter based on physical properties including relative density (sinking and floating).
  • Conduct tests, compare data, and draw conclusions about physical properties of matter including states of matter. Classify matter based on physical properties including physical state.
  • Know that each element is made of one kind of atom and that the elements are organized in the periodic table by their chemical properties.
  • Know the differences between elements and compounds. It is important that students learn the differences between elements and compounds based on observation, description of physical properties, and chemical reactions. Elements are represented by chemical symbols, while compounds are represented by chemical formulas.
  • Observe and record changes in the states of matter caused by the addition or reduction of heat.
  • Recognize that a limited number of the many known elements comprise the largest portion of solid Earth, living matter, oceans, and the atmosphere.
  • Understand that different substances usually have different densities, so density can be used as an identifying property. Therefore, calculating density aids in the classification of substances.
  • Understand that elements are classified as metals, nonmetals, and metalloids based on their physical properties. The elements are divided into three groups on the periodic table.

Unit 1: Tuck Everlasting [LA]

Language Arts

  • Analyze communication using knowledge of language structure.
  • Analyze how the organizational patterns of a text (e.g., cause and effect) influence the relationship among ideas.
  • Analyze the effect of author's craft on the reader.
  • Analyze, make inferences, and draw conclusions about the author's purpose in cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support understanding.
  • Construct engaging, well-argued, coherent, and convincing responses to ideas.
  • Continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity.
  • Demonstrate the different roles of the parts of speech in sentence construction.
  • Describe the phenomena explained in origin myths from various cultures.
  • Develop drafts following the cause-and-effect organizational strategy.
  • Discuss and analyze the effects of figurative language techniques.
  • Draw conclusions from the information presented by an author and evaluate how well the author's purpose was achieved.
  • Evaluate arguments for sound judgments, audience awareness, theme, and use of relevant and coherent reason.
  • Evaluate the use of figurative language to influence the reader's perspective.
  • Explain how figurative language contributes to text.
  • Explain messages conveyed in various forms of media.
  • Explain the similarities and differences in the setting, characters, and plot of a play and those in a film based upon the same story line.
  • Give an organized presentation with a specific point of view, employing eye contact, speaking rate, volume, enunciation, natural gestures, and conventions of language to communicate ideas effectively.
  • Identify and understand the function of different parts of speech in the context of reading and writing.
  • Identify elements of fiction and nonfiction and provide support by referencing the text to determine the effectiveness of figurative language.
  • Identify the forms of fiction and describe the major characteristics of each form.
  • Interpret text by recognizing and explaining theme.
  • Know key vocabulary critical to the text and apply appropriate meanings as necessary for comprehension
  • Listen to and interpret a speaker's messages.
  • Make connections within and between texts by recognizing similarities and differences based on a common lesson, theme, or message.
  • Present individual presentations that use evaluative techniques.
  • Produce a multimedia presentation involving text and graphics using available technology.
  • Read a variety of texts, including myths.
  • Recognize the effectiveness of figurative language within a text.
  • Speak clearly and to the point, using the conventions of language.
  • Summarize the main ideas and supporting details in text.
  • Theorize on the causes and effects of each problem and establish connections between the defined problem and at least one solution.
  • Use and understand pronouns in reading, writing, and speaking.
  • Use and understand the function of adjectives.
  • Use and understand the function of different parts of speech in the context of reading and writing.
  • Use context (e.g., in-sentence restatement) to determine or clarify the meaning of unfamiliar or multiple-meaning words.
  • Write similes and metaphors.

Unit 2: Civil Rights [SS]

Social Studies

  • Evaluate the effectiveness of civil rights and social movements throughout United States history that reflect the struggle for equality and constitutional rights for all citizens.
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of civil rights and social movements throughout United States' history that reflect the struggle for equality and constitutional rights for all citizens.
  • Explore and use research processes to meet information needs.
  • Explore sources and formats for reading, listening, and viewing purposes.
  • Identify the accomplishments of notable individuals such as Martin Luther King, Jr., Rosa Parks, and others who have made contributions to society in the area of civil rights.
  • Reflect the struggle for equality and constitutional rights for all citizens.
  • Trace the civil rights and equal rights movements of various groups in the 20th century and identify key leaders in these movement.
  • Trace the civil rights and equal rights movements of various groups in the 20th century and identify key leaders in these movements.

Unit 2: Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry [LA]

Language Arts

  • Analyze, make inferences, and draw conclusions about the author's purpose in cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts.
  • Combine and rearrange sentences.
  • Compose a variety of fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama on a variety of topics in a variety of formats, including business letters.
  • Connect and clarify main ideas by identifying their relationships to other sources and related topics.
  • Critique the credibility of characterization and the degree to which a plot is contrived or realistic.
  • Deliver focused, coherent presentations that convey ideas clearly.
  • Deliver oral responses to literature that summarize significant events and details and articulate an understanding of several ideas or images communicated by the literary work.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of conventional written and spoken expression by using phrases and clauses correctly.
  • Determine the meaning of unfamiliar vocabulary words by using context clues and/or a dictionary.
  • Develop and apply appropriate criteria to evaluate the quality of the communication by considering the implications, consequences, or impact of those conclusions.
  • Develop drafts by using an appropriate organizational strategy and building on ideas to create a focused, organized, and coherent piece of writing.
  • Edit and revise manuscripts to improve the meaning and focus of writing by adding, deleting, consolidating, clarifying, and rearranging words and sentences.
  • Edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling.
  • Emphasize salient points to assist the listener in following the main ideas and concepts.
  • Explore a variety of sources from which information may be attained.
  • Extend vocabulary knowledge by learning and using new words.
  • Follow multiple-step instructions for preparing applications (e.g., for a public library card, bank savings account, sports club, league membership).
  • Follow multiple-step instructions for preparing applications (e.g., for a public library card, bank savings account, sports club, league membership).
  • Identify and correctly use prepositional phrases and independent and dependent clauses.
  • In written pieces, include simple and compound sentences and improve transitions by adding, deleting, combining, and rearranging sentences or larger units of text.
  • Listen actively and critically by asking questions and delving more deeply into the topic.
  • Plan a first draft by selecting a genre appropriate for conveying the intended meaning to an audience.
  • Produce work that follows the conventions of particular genres (e.g., essay, feature story, business letter).
  • Read and respond to historically or culturally significant works of literature.
  • Recognize dialect and conversational voice and explain how authors use dialect to convey character.
  • Revise drafts to clarify meaning and enhance style.
  • Support opinions with detailed evidence and with visual or media displays that use appropriate technology.
  • Use a variety of preliminary strategies to plan and organize the writing and speaking task considering purpose, audience, and timeline.
  • Use complete simple and compound sentences with correct subject-verb agreement.
  • Use conjunctions to connect ideas.
  • Use critical thinking skills to evaluate print and non-print materials.
  • Use effective rate, volume, pitch, and tone and align nonverbal elements to sustain audience interest and attention.
  • Use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text.
  • Use semicolons to connect independent clauses and commas when linking two clauses with a conjunction in compound sentences.
  • Use simple, compound, and compound-complex sentences; use effective coordination and subordination of ideas to express complete thoughts.
  • Write formal and informal letters that convey ideas, include important information, demonstrate a sense of closure, and use appropriate conventions (e.g., date, salutation, closing).
  • Write persuasive letters.
  • Write research reports about important ideas, issues, or events.
  • Write responses to literary or expository texts.

Unit 3: Chemical Change [S]

Science

  • Demonstrate that some mixtures maintain the physical properties of their ingredients, such as iron filings and sand.
  • Distinguish between physical and chemical changes in matter in the digestive system.
  • Identify changes that can occur in the physical properties of the ingredients of solutions such as dissolving sugar in water, dissolving salt in water, or adding lemon juice to water.
  • Identify that organic compounds contain carbon and other elements such as hydrogen, oxygen, phosphorus, nitrogen, or sulfur.
  • Identify the formation of compounds by using the evidence of a possible chemical change such as a change in temperature.
  • Identify the formation of compounds by using the evidence of a possible chemical change such as color change.
  • Identify the formation of compounds by using the evidence of a possible chemical change such as production of a gas.
  • Identify the formation of compounds by using the evidence of a possible chemical change such as production of a precipitate.
  • Know all matter is made of atoms, which may combine to form molecules.
  • Know metals have properties in common and that some metals are pure elements; others, such as steel and brass, are composed of a combination of elemental metals.
  • Know properties of solid, liquid, and gaseous substances, such as sugar (C6H12O6), water (H2O), helium (He), oxygen (O2), nitrogen (N2), and carbon dioxide (CO2).
  • Know properties of solid, liquid, and gaseous substances, such as sugar, water, helium, oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide.
  • Know scientists have developed instruments that can create discrete images of atoms and molecules that show that the atoms and molecules often occur in well-ordered arrays.
  • Know that during chemical reactions, the atoms in the reactants rearrange to form products with different properties.
  • Know that the differences in chemical and physical properties of substances are used to separate mixtures and identify compounds.
  • Know the common properties of salts/bases, such as sodium chloride (NaCl), and acids.
  • Observe and measure characteristic properties of substances that remain constant such as boiling points and melting points.
  • Recognize how large molecules are broken down into smaller molecules, i.e., carbohydrates can be broken down into sugars.

Unit 3: The Giver [LA]

Language Arts

  • Analyze, make inferences, and draw conclusions about the author's purpose in cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support understanding.
  • Compose a draft that elaborates on major ideas and adheres to the topic by using an appropriate organizational pattern that accomplishes the purpose of the writing task and effectively communicates its content.
  • Describe the function and effect of common literary devices, such as symbolism and imagery.
  • Determine the impact of word choice on written and spoken language.
  • Develop written responses supporting details and precise verbs, nouns, and adjectives to paint a visual image in the mind of the reader.
  • Differentiate between the active and passive voice and know how to use them both.
  • Draw inferences, conclusions, or generalizations about text and support them with textual evidence and prior knowledge.
  • Evaluate the impact of sensory details, imagery, and figurative language in literary text.
  • Examine reasons for a character's actions, taking into account the situation and basic motivation of the character.
  • Explain messages conveyed in various forms of media.
  • Explain whether facts included in an argument are used for or against an issue.
  • Infer the implicit theme of a work of fiction.
  • Interpret text by explaining theme.
  • Recognize exaggerated, contradictory, or misleading statements in text.
  • Recognize how various techniques influence viewers' emotions.
  • Recognize underlying messages in order to identify theme(s) within and across works.
  • Respond to fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama using interpretive, critical, and evaluative processes by creating and presenting a product that effectively demonstrates a personal response to a selection or experience.
  • Select key vocabulary critical to the text and apply appropriate meanings as necessary for comprehension.
  • Spell roots, suffixes, prefixes, contractions, and syllable constructions correctly.
  • Summarize the main ideas and supporting details in text, demonstrating an understanding that a summary does not include opinions.
  • Understand, make inferences, and draw conclusions about how an author's sensory language creates imagery in literary text, and provide evidence from text to support that understanding.
  • Use a dictionary, a glossary, or a thesaurus (printed or electronic) to determine the meanings, syllabication, pronunciations, alternate word choices, and parts of speech of words.
  • Use and understand the function of active verbs and active voice.
  • Use and understand the function of the parts of speech (noun, verb, adjective, and adverbs) in the context of reading, writing, and speaking.
  • Use capitalization for abbreviations, initials and acronyms, and organizations.
  • Use complete simple and compound sentences.
  • Use proper mechanics including italics and underlining for titles of books.
  • Write about personal experiences.
  • Write persuasive letters.
  • Write responses to literary or expository texts that demonstrate an understanding of a literary work.

Science

  • Recognize underlying messages in order to identify theme within and across works. (LA)