Summary of Skills

Age 9-11 - Concept 4: Systems

Unit 1: Space [S]

Science

  • Analyze a historic timeline of space exploration.
  • Analyze the benefits generated by space exploration technology.
  • Analyze the components and cycles of the solar system including the planets and ellipses.
  • Analyze the cycles of the solar system including seasons, days, and years.
  • Compare and contrast the Earth to other planets in terms of size, composition, and relative distance from the Sun.
  • Describe how the Moon's appearance changes during the four-week lunar cycle.
  • Describe the setting of the solar system in the universe.
  • Experience how telescopes magnify the appearance of some distant objects in the sky, including the Moon and the planets.
  • Explain how the position of the Sun changes during the course of the day and from season to season.
  • Explain space explorations and the understandings gained from them.
  • Name the components of the solar system, including planet Earth, the Moon, the Sun, seven other planets and their satellites, asteroids, and comets.
  • Recognize NASA technologies used to explore space.
  • Recognize that the position of the Sun in the sky changes during the course of a day and from season to season because the Earth is constantly rotating and revolving.
  • Recognize the differences between comets, asteroids, and meteors.
  • Recognize the solar system includes the planet Earth, the Moon, the Sun, seven other planets and their satellites, and smaller objects, such as asteroids and comets.
  • Recognize the Sun as the central and largest body in the solar system, composed primarily of hydrogen and helium.
  • Understand that Earth is one of several planets that orbit the Sun and that the Moon orbits Earth.
  • Understand that the path of a planet around the Sun is due to the gravitational attraction between the Sun and the planet.

Unit 1: A Wrinkle in Time [LA]

Language Arts

  • Analyze characters, including their traits, motivations, conflicts, relationships, and the changes they undergo.
  • Analyze published examples as models for writing.
  • Analyze the characteristics of various types of texts (genres).
  • Combine short, related sentences.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of verb tense consistency.
  • Determine meanings of derivatives by applying knowledge of the meanings of root words such as like, pay, or happy and affixes such as dis-, pre-, and -un.
  • Edit and revise selected drafts to improve coherence and progression by adding, deleting, consolidating, and rearranging text.
  • Elaborate on ideas in writing by using regular and irregular verbs.
  • Evaluate how well a writer's own writing achieves its purposes.
  • Generate ideas and plans for writing by using such prewriting strategies as brainstorming, graphic organizers, notes, and logs.
  • Identify and use regular and irregular verbs.
  • Identify the theme of a story.
  • Interpret text ideas through discussion.
  • Judge the internal consistency or logic of stories and texts such as "Would this character do this?"; "Does this make sense here?"
  • Locate the meanings, pronunciations, and derivations of unfamiliar words.
  • Make and confirm predictions about text by using prior knowledge and ideas presented in the text itself.
  • Offer observations, make connections, react, speculate, and interpret in response to text.
  • Organize knowledge by producing graphic organizers.
  • Produce visual images, messages, and meanings that communicate to others.
  • Produce work that follows the conventions of particular genres.
  • Provide a context to enable the reader to imagine the world of the event or experience.
  • Read for varied purposes such as to be informed, to be entertained, to appreciate the writer's craft, and to discover models for one's own writing.
  • Recognize that authors organize information in specific ways.
  • Recognize the distinguishing features of genres.
  • Represent text information in different ways such as in outline, timeline, or graphic organizer.
  • Summarize major points from fiction and nonfiction text(s) to clarify and retain information and ideas.
  • Understand and interpret visual images, messages, and meanings.
  • Use adjectives (comparative and superlative forms) and adverbs appropriately to make writing vivid or precise.
  • Use adjectives and adverbs appropriately to make writing vivid or precise.
  • Use established criteria to edit for language conventions.
  • Use regular and irregular plurals correctly.
  • Use transition words effectively.
  • Write summaries that contain the main ideas and most significant details of the reading selection.
  • Write to entertain such as to compose humorous poems or short stories.
  • Write to entertain.
  • Write to express, discover, record, develop, and reflect on ideas.
  • Write with increasing accuracy when using apostrophes.

Science

  • Identify functions of various organs.
  • Summarize major points from fiction and nonfiction text to clarify and retain information and ideas. (LA)

Unit 2: State Government and Economics [SS]

Social Studies

  • Analyze how people in different parts of the United States earn a living, past and present.
  • Analyze the effects of immigration, migration, and limited resources on the economic development and growth of the United States.
  • Analyze the relationship between government services and taxes.
  • Analyze the structure of state government.
  • Assess how the state's natural resources are being used.
  • Categorize resources as natural, human, or capital.
  • Describe the impact of mass production, specialization, and division of labor on the economic growth of the United States.
  • Describe the similarities and differences among the local, state, and national levels of government in the United States and explain their legislative, executive, and judicial functions.
  • Describe the ways states specialize in economic activity and the relationship between specialization and interdependence.
  • Distinguish between national and state governments and compare their responsibilities in the U.S. federal system.
  • Evaluate the effects of supply and demand on business, industry, and agriculture, including the plantation system, in the United States.
  • Evaluate the significance of economic relationships among other states.
  • Examine ways the state is governed.
  • Explain how supply and demand affects consumers in the United States.
  • Explain the impact of American ideas about progress and equality of opportunity on the economic development and growth of the United States.
  • Explain the importance of responsible citizenship and identify ways citizens can participate in civic affairs.
  • Identify and explain how geographic factors influence the location of economic activities in the United States.
  • Identify and explain the basic function of the state government system.
  • Identify how geography has influenced the location of economic activities in the United States.
  • Identify important state government offices.
  • Identify people, symbols, and events associated with your state.
  • Identify the role of government leaders in the state.
  • Recognize that money can be used for spending, saving, and paying taxes.
  • Understand the basic function of the three branches of government within a state government.

Unit 2: Lincoln [LA]

Language Arts

  • Create readable documents through legible handwriting or word processing.
  • Demonstrate effective communication skills in an interview.
  • Describe the structural differences of various imaginative forms of writing.
  • Distinguish between the speaker's opinion and verifiable fact.
  • Identify and analyze a speaker's persuasive techniques such as promises, dares, and flattery.
  • Identify and use appositives in writing.
  • Identify structural patterns found in informational text.
  • Interpret and evaluate the various ways visual image makers such as graphic artists, illustrators, and news photographers represent meanings.
  • Interpret speakers' messages (both verbal and nonverbal), purposes, and perspectives.
  • Locate the meanings, pronunciations, and derivations of unfamiliar words using dictionaries.
  • Paraphrase and summarize text to recall, inform, and organize ideas.
  • Present effective introductions and conclusions that guide and inform the listener's understanding of important ideas.
  • Present information in various forms.
  • Produce communications using technology or appropriate media such as developing a class newspaper.
  • Produce research projects and reports in effective formats using visuals to support meaning, as appropriate.
  • Raise questions in response to text.
  • Read for varied purposes such as to be informed, to be entertained, to appreciate the writer's craft, and to discover models for the reader's own writing.
  • Refine selected pieces frequently to "publish" for general and specific audiences.
  • Represent information in text in a variety of formats.
  • Represent text using a timeline.
  • Support judgments through references to both the text and prior knowledge.
  • Use available technology to support aspects of creating, revising, editing, and publishing texts.
  • Use details, examples, anecdotes, or experiences to explain or clarify information.
  • Use multiple reference aids - including a thesaurus, a synonym finder, a dictionary, and software - to clarify meanings and usage.
  • Use oral and written language to interview a person.
  • Use oral, written, and visual information to research and understand how individuals have had an impact on individuals, their community and their nation. (SS)
  • Use participle phrases correctly in sentences.
  • Use participle phrases to combine short sentences.
  • Use volume, pitch, phrasing, pace, modulation, and gestures appropriately to enhance meaning.

Social Studies

  • Describe the impact the Civil War had on the North and the South.
  • Distinguish between national and state governments and compare their responsibilities in the U.S. federal system.
  • Identify historical sites across the country.
  • Identify leaders in government.
  • Identify the function of government.
  • Recognize the contributions of Americans throughout history.
  • Recount the lives of individuals from the past.
  • Summarize the sequence of key events in stories describing life from the past.
  • Understand issues that lead to the Civil War.
  • Use oral, written, and visual information to research and understand how individuals have had an impact on individuals, their community and their nation. (LA)

Unit 3: The Human Body [S]

Science

  • Analyze how human body systems interact to provide for the needs of the human organism.
  • Apply information from the food guide pyramid to making healthy food choices.
  • Conduct investigations to build an understanding of the form and function of the skeletal and muscle systems of the human body.
  • Describe food combinations in a balanced diet such as a food pyramid.
  • Describe how different kinds of joints allow movement.
  • Describe how systems within the human body are defined by the functions they perform.
  • Describe interactions that occur within a system.
  • Describe the basic function of major body systems.
  • Describe the functions of different types of joints.
  • Evaluate how systems in the human body help regulate the internal environment.
  • Explain how organs are adapted to perform specific functions within one or more systems.
  • Explain how the structure of an organ is adapted to perform specific functions within one or more systems.
  • Explain the body's defense systems and how they fight disease.
  • Identify information on menus and food labels.
  • Identify the benefits of six major nutrients contained in foods.
  • Recognize how muscles cause the body to move.
  • Recognize the parts of a cell.
  • Recognize the role of the teeth and mouth in digestion.
  • Understand that many multi-cellular organisms have specialized structures to support the transport of materials.

Unit 3: Independent Study [LA]

Language Arts

  • Adjust pitch, tone, and body language when making oral presentations.
  • Analyze and integrate information from one or more sources to expand understanding of text including graphs, charts, and/or maps.
  • Cite sources of information.
  • Compose a draft that conveys major ideas and maintains focus on the topic with specific, relevant, supporting details.
  • Conclude with a paragraph that summarizes the essay.
  • Conduct research for assigned projects or self-selected projects.
  • Draw from more than one source of information when writing a report (e.g., speakers, books, newspapers, other media sources).
  • Establish and support a central idea with a thesis sentence at or near the conclusion of the first paragraph.
  • Form and revise questions for investigations, including questions arising from interests.
  • Frame central questions about an issue.
  • Include facts and details for focus in report writing.
  • Include supporting paragraphs with simple facts, details, and explanations.
  • Locate relevant information on a topic.
  • Make oral and written presentations using visual aids with an awareness of purpose and audience.
  • Produce research projects and reports in effective formats using visuals to support meaning.
  • Provide an introductory paragraph for a paper.
  • Use planning strategies to generate topics and organize ideas.