Summary of Skills

Age 9-11 - Concept 3: Discovery and Survival

Unit 1: Colonization and Revolution [SS]

Social Studies

  • Analyze the causes and effects of events surrounding the American Revolution such as the Boston Tea Party.
  • Describe the competition among the English, French, Spanish, Dutch, and Native American nations for control of North America.
  • Describe the cooperation that existed between the colonists and Native Americans during the 1600s and 1700s (e.g., in agriculture, the fur trade, military alliances, treaties, cultural interchanges).
  • Describe the destructive conflicts between the colonists and Native Americans, including the competing claims for control of lands.
  • Describe the introduction of slavery into America.
  • Describe the religious aspects of the earliest colonies.
  • Describe the views, lives, and impact of key individuals during this period.
  • Explain the democratic ideas and practices that emerged during the colonial period, including the significance of representative assemblies and town meetings.
  • Explain the differences between the British, Spanish, and French colonial systems.
  • Explain the early democratic ideas and practices that emerged during the colonial period.
  • Explain the early democratic ideas and summarize the results of the American Revolution, including the establishment of the United States.
  • Identify the contributions of significant individuals during the revolutionary period.
  • Identify the major individuals and groups responsible for the founding of various colonies and the reasons for their founding.
  • Recognize how conflict between the American colonies and Great Britain led to American independence.
  • Recognize the practices that emerged during the colonial period, including the significance of representative assemblies.
  • Understand how political, religious, and economic ideas and interests brought about the Revolution.
  • Understand how the British colonial period laid the basis for political self-government and a free-market economic system.
  • Understand the events that led from the Articles of Confederation to the creation of the U.S. Constitution and the government it established.
  • Understand the events that led to the Declaration of Independence.
  • Understand the influence of location and physical setting on the founding of the 13 colonies, and identify on a map the colonies and the Native American nations already inhabiting these areas.
  • Understand the influence of location and physical setting on the founding of the thirteen colonies, and identify on a map the colonies and the Native American nations already inhabiting these areas.
  • Understand the ongoing struggle between proponents and opponents of slavery and the gradual institutionalization of slavery in the South.
  • Understand the people and events associated with the drafting and signing of the Declaration of Independence and the document's significance, including the key political concepts it embodies, the origins of those concepts, and its role in severing ties with Great Britain.

Unit 1: The Witch of Blackbird Pond [LA]

Language Arts

  • Analyze characters and their conflicts.
  • Combine short or incomplete sentences with conjunctions.
  • Compare and contrast information on a topic after reading several passages.
  • Create multiple-paragraph compositions that conclude with a paragraph that summarizes the points.
  • Create multiple-paragraph compositions that establish and support a central idea with a topic sentence in the first paragraph.
  • Create multiple-paragraph compositions that include supporting paragraphs with simple facts, details, and explanations.
  • Create multiple-paragraph compositions that provide an introductory paragraph.
  • Create multiple-paragraph compositions that use correct indention.
  • Create multiple-paragraph compositions that use traditional structures for conveying information.
  • Define figurative language (e.g., simile, metaphor, hyperbole, personification) and identify its use in literary works.
  • Draw conclusions or generalizations and support them with textual evidence and experience.
  • Draw facts from a source of information.
  • Edit and revise selected drafts to improve coherence and progression by adding, deleting, consolidating, and rearranging text.
  • Edit writing to ensure appropriate word choice.
  • Evaluate how well his/her own writing achieves its purposes.
  • Exhibit an identifiable voice in personal narratives and stories.
  • Expand vocabulary through reading.
  • Follow multiple-step instructions.
  • Increase reading and writing vocabulary through word study.
  • Make inferences, draw conclusions, make generalizations, and support by referencing the text.
  • Provide a context to enable the reader to imagine the world of the event or experience.
  • Provide insight into why the selected event or experience is memorable.
  • Recognize sentence fragments.
  • Relate ideas, observations, or recollections of an event or experience.
  • Select a focus, an organizational structure, and a point of view based upon purpose, audience, length, and format requirements.
  • Select a focus, organizational structure, and point of view based upon purpose, audience, length, and format requirements.
  • Support judgments about the text using references to the text and prior knowledge.
  • Understand the major ideas and supporting evidence in text.
  • Use a variety of types of sentences, such as compound and complex.
  • Use adjectives and adverbs appropriately to make writing vivid or precise.
  • Use commas and quotation marks correctly when writing direct quotations.
  • Use concrete sensory details in writing.
  • Use descriptive phrases to elaborate upon written ideas.
  • Use oral and written language to present information in a clear, concise manner.
  • Use technology as a tool to gather information.
  • Verify the accuracy of the author's writing by referencing resources.
  • Write to entertain.
  • Write to reflect.

Social Studies

  • Describe the religious aspects of the earliest colonies.
  • Examine government conflicts in the colonies before the Revolutionary War.
  • Understand how the British colonial period created the basis for the development of political self-government and a free-market economic system.
  • Understand the influence of location and physical setting on the founding of the original 13 colonies.

Unit 2: Technology and Invention [S]

Science

  • Appreciate scientific discoveries of the past.
  • Build and use a model to solve a mechanical design problem, devise a test for the model, and evaluate the results of test.
  • Collect information by observing.
  • Describe how scientific discoveries and technological innovations have benefited individuals.
  • Determine how people use simple machines to solve problems.
  • Evaluate the impact of research on scientific thought.
  • Examine the progression of tool use and the development of tools over time.
  • Experiment with a variety of materials.
  • Explore the progression of technology from the first primitive tools to today's personal computer.
  • Identify scientists and inventors who have created or invented new technology.
  • Identify the impact of improved technology.
  • Recognize how people use simple machines to solve problems.
  • Recognize that complex machines and systems consist of combinations of simple machines.
  • Recognize the impact of new technology in photography, farm equipment, pasteurization, and medical vaccines on communities around the world.

Social Studies

  • Explain how scientific discoveries have benefited society.
  • Forecast how technology can be managed to benefit the greatest number of people.
  • Identify how scientific discoveries and technological innovations have advanced the economic development of the United States.
  • Identify scientists and inventors who have created or invented new technology.
  • Recognize the impact of new technology.
  • Relate how certain technological discoveries have changed the course of history and reflect on the broader social and environmental changes that can occur from the discovery of such technologies.
  • Understand how individuals have created or invented new technology and affected life in communities around the world, past and present.

Unit 2: The Invention of Hugo Cabret [LA]

Language Arts

  • Analyze various imaginative forms of literature including myths.
  • Articulate and discuss themes and connections that cross cultures.
  • Compare and contrast print, visual, and electronic media.
  • Compose a draft that conveys major ideas and maintains focus on the topic with specific, relevant supporting details.
  • Connect, compare, and contrast ideas, themes, and issues across text.
  • Demonstrate effective communications skills.
  • Describe how illustrators' choice of style, elements, and media help to represent or extend the texts' meanings.
  • Interpret and evaluate the ways visual image makers, such as graphic artists, illustrators, and news photographers, represent meanings.
  • Interpret speakers' messages.
  • Know common roots and affixes derived from Greek and Latin and use this knowledge to analyze the meanings of complex words.
  • Listen critically and respond appropriately to oral communication.
  • Make and confirm predictions about text.
  • Make oral and written presentations.
  • Organize knowledge about a topic in a variety of ways.
  • Produce research projects and reports in effective formats.
  • Provide a context that enables the listener to imagine the circumstances of the event or experience.
  • Provide a context to enable the reader to imagine an event or experience.
  • Provide insight into why the selected event or experience is memorable.
  • Quote or paraphrase information sources, citing them appropriately.
  • Read aloud in ways that reflect understanding of the text and engage the listener.
  • Recite brief poems (i.e., two or three stanzas), soliloquies or dramatic dialogues, and stories using clear diction, tempo, volume, and phrasing.
  • Recognize that authors organize information in specific ways.
  • Relate ideas, observations, or recollections of an event or experience.
  • Spell correctly roots, inflections, suffixes and prefixes, and syllable constructions.
  • Spell correctly words that contain common prefixes and suffixes.
  • Understand and explore literary forms by recognizing and distinguishing among such types of text as stories, poems, myths, fables, and tall tales.
  • Understand the major ideas and supporting evidence in spoken messages.
  • Use concrete sensory details.
  • Use effective rate, volume, pitch, and tone for the audience and setting.
  • Use media to compare ideas and points of view.
  • Use multiple sources, including electronic texts, experts, and print resources, to locate information.
  • Use planning strategies such as brainstorming and mapping to generate topics and organize ideas.
  • Use simple and compound sentences in speaking.
  • Use structural analysis to identify root words with prefixes and suffixes.
  • Use technology as a tool to gather, organize, and present information.
  • Use traditional structures for conveying information.
  • Use various reference materials (e.g., dictionary, thesaurus, card catalog, encyclopedia, online information) as an aid to writing.

Unit 3: Westward Expansion [SS]

Language Arts

  • Communicate using technology or appropriate media.
  • Select, organize, or produce visuals to complement and extend meanings.

Social Studies

  • Demonstrate knowledge of the exploration and settlement of the trans-Mississippi West following the Louisiana Purchase.
  • Describe clusters of settlement in the United States and explain their distribution.
  • Describe the rapid migration to the West.
  • Describe the religious and ethnic impact of settlement on different regions of the United States.
  • Discuss the experiences of settlers on the overland trails to the West (e.g., location of the routes; purpose of the journey; the influence of the terrain, rivers, vegetation, and climate; life in the territories at the end of these trails).
  • Discuss the experiences of settlers on the overland trails to the West.
  • Examine how changes in the movement of people, goods, and ideas have affected life in the United States.
  • Explain how the discovery of natural resources changed the West.
  • Explain the geographic factors that influence patterns of settlement and the distribution of population in the United States, past and present.
  • Explain the geographic factors that influence patterns of settlement.
  • Explain when, where, why, and how groups of people settled in different regions of the United States.
  • Identify and describe the types of settlement and patterns of land use in the United States.
  • Identify examples of the United States' territorial expansion.
  • Identify reasons why people have adapted to and modified their environment.
  • Understand patterns and reasons for westward migration.
  • Understand the influence of the Transcontinental Railroad.
  • Understand the story and lasting influence of the spirit of the West.

Unit 3: The Ballad of Lucy Whipple [LA]

Language Arts

  • Acquire vocabulary through reading and word study.
  • Analyze characters' traits and points of view.
  • Apply an understanding of synonyms when writing.
  • Apply knowledge of idioms to determine meanings.
  • Apply knowledge of synonyms and antonyms to determine meaning of words.
  • Articulate and discuss themes.
  • Ask different types of questions.
  • Combine short, related sentences with appositives, participial phrases, adjectives, adverbs, and prepositional phrases.
  • Compare text events with personal experiences.
  • Compose poetry using assigned topics and forms.
  • Conduct research and raise new questions for further investigation.
  • Draw conclusions and make inferences about characters.
  • Elaborate ideas in writing by using prepositions.
  • Emphasize points in ways that help the listener or viewer to follow important ideas and concepts.
  • Examine reasons for characters' actions.
  • Frame questions to direct research.
  • Give precise directions and instructions.
  • Identify and interpret elements of fiction by referencing text.
  • Identify and interpret major themes in novels by referencing the text.
  • Identify and use parts of speech in writing.
  • Identify and use prepositions.
  • Identify how language usages (e.g., sayings and expressions) reflect regions and cultures.
  • Increase reading and writing vocabulary through word study.
  • Interact with text by making connections with previous experiences.
  • Make inferences and draw conclusions about events and themes within a novel.
  • Make inferences and draw conclusions about themes.
  • Monitor comprehension by asking questions.
  • Organize and compose letters.
  • Paraphrase and summarize text.
  • Present effective introductions and conclusions that guide and inform the listener's understanding of important ideas and evidence.
  • Produce works that follow the conventions of a particular genre, including letter writing.
  • Recognize the distinguishing features of poetry.
  • Summarize major points from fiction text.
  • Take notes from relevant sources.
  • Use a thesaurus to find synonyms for words.
  • Use a variety of sentence types, such as compound and complex.
  • Use details, examples, anecdotes, or experiences to explain or clarify information.
  • Use knowledge of characters' traits to determine motivations.
  • Use prepositional phrases to elaborate ideas.
  • Use reference aids to clarify meanings and usage of vocabulary words.
  • Use traditional structures for conveying information (e.g., cause and effect, similarity and difference, posing and answering a question).
  • Write in complete sentences, varying the types, such as compound and complex.