Summary of Skills

Age 9-11 - Concept 1: Relationships

Unit 1: The Fifty States [SS]

Science

  • Identify how energy is passed from one organism to another.

Social Studies

  • Analyze how people in different parts of the United States earn a living, past and present.
  • Analyze the consequences of human modification of the environment, past and present.
  • Compare and contrast the physical and cultural characteristics of regions within the United States.
  • Describe a variety of environments found in the United States.
  • Describe a variety of regions in the United States.
  • Describe the absolute and relative location of major landforms, bodies of water, and natural resources in the United States.
  • Describe the distribution of settlement in the United States.
  • Describe the origins and significance of national celebrations such as Memorial Day and Labor Day.
  • Describe the variety of regions in the United States.
  • Describe ways people have adapted to and modified their environment in the United States, past and present.
  • Evaluate the effects of supply and demand on business, industry, and agriculture.
  • Explain how and why population distribution differs within the United States.
  • Explain patterns of settlement at different time periods.
  • Explain population differences within the United States.
  • Explain the geographic factors that influence patterns of settlement and the distribution of population.
  • Explain the meaning of patriotic symbols and landmarks such as the Statue of Liberty and the White House.
  • Identify clusters of settlement in the United States.
  • Identify reasons why people have adapted to and modified their environment, past and present, such as the use of natural resources to meet basic needs.
  • Identify ways people use natural resources to meet their basic needs.
  • Recite and explain the meaning of the Pledge of Allegiance.
  • Translate geographic data into a variety of formats such as graphs and maps.

Unit 1: Poetry [LA]

Language Arts

  • Adapt spoken language such as word choice, diction, and usage to the audience, purpose, and occasion.
  • Apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate texts.
  • Apply knowledge of language structure, grammar, media techniques, figurative language, and genre to create, critique, and discuss texts.
  • Assess how language choice and delivery affect the tone of the message.
  • Compose poetry using self-selected and assigned topics.
  • Compose work that follows the conventions of a particular genre.
  • Connect personal experiences, information, insights, and ideas with those of others through speaking and listening.
  • Define figurative language (e.g., simile, metaphor, hyperbole, personification) and identify its use in literary works.
  • Describe how the language of literature affects the listener.
  • Describe structural differences of various forms of writing.
  • Identify and interpret elements of fiction.
  • Identify examples of figurative language found in text.
  • Identify how language and word choice can reflect regions and cultures.
  • Identify structural patterns found in text.
  • Increase reading and writing vocabulary through the knowledge of synonyms.
  • Listen to, enjoy, and appreciate written language.
  • Paraphrase to indicate active listening.
  • Read a variety of texts, including poetry.
  • Read independently daily to increase vocabulary.
  • Recite brief poems (two or three stanzas), soliloquies, or dramatic dialogues, using clear diction, tempo, volume, and phrasing.
  • Respond to fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama using interpretive, critical, and evaluative processes by analyzing the authors' word choice and context.
  • Select a writing focus, organizational structure, and a point of view based upon purpose, audience, and format requirements.
  • Speak clearly and appropriately to audiences for different purposes and occasions.
  • Think about the tone of voice and the speed at which the poem should be read.
  • Use concrete sensory details in writing.
  • Write the names of poems, short stories, and musical compositions in quotation marks.

Social Studies

  • Describe a variety of regions in the United States.
  • Describe and compare physical and cultural characteristics of the regions.
  • Locate, in absolute and relative terms, major landforms, bodies of water, and natural resources on a map.

Unit 2: Energy [S]

Science

  • Demonstrate that evaporation and melting are changes that occur when the objects are heated.
  • Determine the motion of an object by following and measuring its position over time.
  • Differentiate among forms of energy including light, heat, electrical, nuclear, chemical, sound, mechanical, magnetic, and solar energy.
  • Discuss how foods provide both energy and nutrients for living organisms.
  • Evaluate how pushing or pulling forces change the position and motion of an object.
  • Explain how machines and living things convert stored energy to motion and heat.
  • Explain why organisms require energy to live and grow.
  • Identify sources of stored energy, such as food, fuel, and batteries.
  • Know how energy for your home is produced.
  • Observe that light can be reflected off or absorbed by different surfaces.
  • Recognize plants as the primary source of matter and energy entering most food chains.
  • Recognize that all matter is made of small particles called atoms, too small to see with the naked eye.
  • Recognize that color of light striking an object affects the way the object is seen.
  • Recognize that energy comes from the Sun to the Earth in the form of light.
  • Recognize that light has a source and travels in a direction.
  • Recognize the difference between potential and kinetic energy.
  • Show how calories can be used to compare the chemical energy of different foods.
  • Understand how decomposers, including many fungi, insects, and microorganisms, recycle matter from dead plants and animals.
  • Understand how energy is carried from one place to another by waves, such as water waves and sound waves, by electric current, and by moving objects.
  • Understand how plants are the primary source of matter and energy entering most food chains.
  • Understand how producers and consumers (herbivores, carnivores, omnivores, and decomposers) are related in food chains and webs and compete for resources in an ecosystem.
  • Understand that heat is transferred from hot things to cool things.

Unit 2: The View from Saturday [LA]

Language Arts

  • Analyze characters, including their traits, motivations, conflicts, points of view, relationships, and changes they undergo.
  • Articulate and discuss themes and connections that cross cultures.
  • Compare text events with his own experiences.
  • Connect, compare, and contrast ideas, themes, and issues across text.
  • Define and identify figurative language.
  • Distinguish between a speaker's opinions and verifiable facts.
  • Exhibit an identifiable voice in personal narratives and in stories.
  • Frame central questions about a topic.
  • Frame thoughtful questions.
  • Identify and use adverbs.
  • Identify how the use of language reflects a culture.
  • Interpret ideas from a text through varied means such as journal writing, discussion, and reenactment.
  • Interpret speakers' messages and perspectives.
  • Locate the meanings, pronunciations, and derivations of unfamiliar words using dictionaries.
  • Make oral and written presentations using visual aids with an awareness of purpose and audience.
  • Produce research projects and reports.
  • Produce work that follows the conventions of particular genres, including letters of request.
  • Recognize and analyze story plot, setting, and problem resolution.
  • Recognize homonyms and their meanings.
  • Summarize and organize information by outlining ideas.
  • Support his own ideas by citing examples in the text and personal experiences.
  • Understand and identify literary and dramatic terms such as scene, dialogue, stage direction, and act.
  • Use multiple sources to locate relevant information.
  • Use oral and written language to present information and ideas in a clear, concise manner.
  • Write to explain, describe, or report.

Unit 3: Your State [SS]

Language Arts

  • Recognize and use a table of contents.

Social Studies

  • Analyze the effects of advancements and discoveries on citizens.
  • Analyze the impact of your state's citizens, past and present, on the nation's artistic and cultural development.
  • Analyze the relationship between the Federal Government and the states.
  • Assess and evaluate the importance of regional and state diversity on economic, social, and political institutions.
  • Assess changes in ways of living over time.
  • Assess how your state's natural resources are being used.
  • Cite examples from your state's history that had an impact on the advancement of America.
  • Describe and compare characteristics of different regions in your state.
  • Describe elements of the social history of your state.
  • Describe the various regions of your state, including how their characteristics and physical environments (e.g., water, landforms, vegetation, and climate) affect human activity.
  • Describe ways your state specializes in economic activity.
  • Evaluate the economic relationship your state has with other states.
  • Explain cultural traditions of your state.
  • Explain how goods, ideas, and people have changed over time in your state.
  • Identify examples of resources in your state and community.
  • Identify important events associated with your state's history.
  • Identify important geographical features in your state.
  • Identify symbols and documents associated with your state.
  • Identify the location of important geographical destinations within your state.
  • Locate and describe American Indian tribes that lived in your state in the past or still live there today.
  • Locate, in absolute and relative terms, major landforms and bodies of water in your state.
  • Recognize important state symbols.
  • Recognize ways state money is used.
  • Trace the growth and development of your state.
  • Use maps to describe how regions within your state vary in the services they provide, their vegetation, land use, and wildlife.
  • Use maps, charts, and pictures to describe regions.

Unit 3: American Tall Tales and Legends [LA]

Language Arts

  • Analyze the characteristics of various types of text.
  • Compare and contrast information on the same topic after reading several passages or articles.
  • Compare oral traditions across regions and cultures.
  • Consider how language brings characters to life and enhances plot development.
  • Create multiple-paragraph compositions.
  • Define figurative language (e.g., simile, metaphor, hyperbole, personification) and identify its use in literary works.
  • Demonstrate evidence of language cohesion by providing a logical sequence for fiction and nonfiction.
  • Describe how the author's perspective or point of view affects the text.
  • Describe similarities and differences across texts, such as treatment of the topic.
  • Describe the structural differences of various imaginative forms of literature, including fantasies, fables, myths, legends, and fairy tales.
  • Develop theories to account for similar tales in diverse cultures (e.g., trickster tales).
  • Identify and interpret elements of fiction and nonfiction, and then support by referencing the text.
  • Include facts and details that help listeners to focus.
  • Increase reading and writing vocabulary through discussion.
  • Provide a context that enables the listener to imagine the circumstances of the event or experience.
  • Read a variety of text, including folklore and legends.
  • Read independently daily to build background knowledge.
  • Recognize and use figurative language techniques.
  • Recognize distinguishing factors of genre.
  • Select a focus, an organizational structure, and a point of view based upon purpose, audience, length, and format requirements.
  • Summarize and organize information from multiple sources.
  • Write to entertain, such as to compose short stories.

Social Studies

  • Compare and contrast regions within the United States.