Summary of Skills

Age 8-10 - Concept 4: Exploration and Survival

Unit 1: Animal Adaptations [S]

Science

  • Analyze how adaptive characteristics help individuals within a species to survive and reproduce.
  • Collect information by observing and measuring.
  • Communicate valid conclusions.
  • Construct and interpret simple graphs, tables, maps, and charts to organize and evaluate information.
  • Describe environmental changes in which some organisms would thrive, become ill, or perish.
  • Describe how living organisms modify the physical environment to meet their needs, such as beavers building a dam or humans building a home.
  • Explain and discuss how humans and other animals can adapt their behaviors to live in changing habitats.
  • Identify characteristics among species that allow them to survive and reproduce.
  • Observe and describe how all living and nonliving things affect the life of a particular animal including other animals, plants, people, and climate.
  • Observe and discuss how behavior and body structure help an animal survive in a particular habitat.
  • Observe and identify characteristics among species that allow each to survive and reproduce.
  • Observe and record how animals of the same kind differ in characteristics and discuss possible advantages and disadvantages of this variation.
  • Represent the natural world using models.

Social Studies

  • Compare how people in different communities adapt to or modify the physical environment.
  • Describe the effects of physical and human processes in shaping the landscape.

Unit 1: Abel's Island [LA]

Language Arts

  • Analyze characters, including their traits, feelings, relationships, and changes.
  • Answer open-ended questions.
  • Ask questions about text.
  • Compose a draft that conveys major ideas and maintains focus on the topic by using preliminary plans.
  • Compose a variety of fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama selections using a various topics and forms.
  • Compose original poems.
  • Conduct research for projects from a variety of sources (with assistance).
  • Demonstrate an understanding of parts of speech.
  • Develop vocabulary by listening to and discussing both familiar and conceptually challenging reading selections.
  • Draw and discuss visual images based on text descriptions.
  • Draw conclusions, make generalizations, and gather support by referencing the text.
  • Identify (with assistance) the purpose, audience, and appropriate form for the oral or written task.
  • Identify and discuss similarities and differences in events, characters, concepts, and ideas within and across selections and support them by referencing the text.
  • Identify and interpret elements of fiction such as the plot.
  • Identify multisyllabic words by using common syllable patterns.
  • Increase sight vocabulary, reading vocabulary, and writing vocabulary through book discussion.
  • Interact with the text before, during, and after reading, listening, or viewing by making connections.
  • Interact with the text by locating information for specific purposes.
  • Make inferences and draw conclusions about characters and events.
  • Make predictions and inferences while reading.
  • Read independently daily from materials consistent with reading level.
  • Represent text information in different ways, including story maps, graphs, and charts.
  • Respond to fiction by participating in creative interpretations.
  • Respond to literature using interpretive, critical, and evaluative processes by relating plot, characters, and setting to own experience.
  • Share a written and an oral project in a variety of ways.
  • Show understanding and interpretation of text in discussion and writing.
  • Support interpretations or conclusions with examples drawn from text.
  • Use oral and written language to present information in a sequenced, logical manner.
  • Use oral and written language to recount or narrate.
  • Use oral and written language to report on a topic.
  • Use planning strategies (with assistance) to generate topics and organize ideas (e.g., drawing, mapping, discussing, and listing).
  • Use root words and other structural cues such as prefixes, suffixes, and derivational endings to recognize words.
  • Use text and personal experience to verify facts, concepts, and ideas.

Science

  • Explain and discuss how humans and other animals can adapt their behaviors to live in changing habitats.
  • Observe and describe how all living and nonliving things affect the life of a particular animal including weather, other animals, and plants.
  • Observe and discuss how behaviors and body structures help animals survive in a particular habitat.

Social Studies

  • Compare how people in different communities adapt to or modify the physical environment.
  • Draw maps of places and regions that contain map elements including a title, compass rose, legend, scale, and grid system.
  • Use a scale to determine the distance between places on maps and globes.

Unit 2: Early Explorers [SS]

Science

  • Analyze scientific explanations, including hypotheses and theories.
  • Plan and implement investigations.
  • Represent the natural world using models.

Social Studies

  • Describe how individuals, events, and ideas have changed communities over time.
  • Describe how individuals, such as Christopher Columbus, contributed to the expansion of existing communities or to the creation of new communities.
  • Distinguish between various types of maps and globes.
  • Identify and use the compass rose.
  • Identify reasons for early exploration.
  • Identify the accomplishments (and shortcomings) of significant explorers.
  • Use cardinal and intermediate directions to locate places.

Unit 2: Pedro's Journal [LA]

Language Arts

  • Analyze characters, including their traits, feelings, relationships, and changes.
  • Answer relevant questions and make contributions in small or large group discussions.
  • Compare language and oral traditions that reflect customs, regions, and cultures.
  • Compose sentences with interesting, elaborate subjects.
  • Conduct research to learn more about a topic.
  • Demonstrate learning through productions and displays, such as oral and written reports, murals, and dramatizations.
  • Demonstrate understanding of informational text in a variety of ways through writing and illustrating.
  • Determine how his/her own writing achieves its purposes.
  • Develop vocabulary through reading.
  • Distinguish fact from opinion in various texts.
  • Draw conclusions from information gathered.
  • Generate ideas for writing by using prewriting techniques, such as drawing and listing key thoughts.
  • Identify and discuss similarities and differences in events, characters, concepts, and ideas within and across selections and support them by referencing the text.
  • Identify and interpret author's use of figurative language.
  • Identify and interpret elements of fiction and nonfiction and support by referencing the text to determine the author's purpose, plot, and the author's lesson or message.
  • Identify areas for further study.
  • Interact with text by locating information for specific purposes.
  • Read fiction and nonfiction text.
  • Read from a variety of genres and sources for pleasure and to acquire information.
  • Recognize the distinguishing features of familiar genres.
  • Record personal knowledge of a topic in a variety of ways, such as drawing pictures.
  • Represent information in different ways, including story maps, graphs, and charts.
  • Respond to fiction by reflecting on reading, gaining new insights, and identifying areas for further study.
  • Respond to fiction using evaluative processes by considering the main character's point of view.
  • Respond to fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama using interpretive, critical, and evaluative processes by considering the differences among genres.
  • Share written and oral products in a variety of ways.
  • Use correct punctuation and capitalization.
  • Use criteria to identify the most effective features of a piece of writing.
  • Use oral or written language to recount or narrate.
  • Use planning strategies (with assistance) to generate topics and organize ideas.
  • Use quotation marks within sentences to indicate words spoken.
  • Use resources and references, such as beginners' dictionaries, glossaries, available technology, and context to build word meanings.
  • Use text and personal experiences to verify facts, concepts, and ideas.
  • Use vocabulary clearly to describe ideas, feelings, and experiences.
  • Write in different forms for different purposes.
  • Write to communicate with a variety of audiences.
  • Write to record and develop ideas and reflections.

Social Studies

  • Examine the significance of art within a culture.
  • Give examples of community changes that result from individual or group decisions.
  • Identify examples of actions individuals and groups can take to improve the community.

Unit 3: Work, Tools, and Simple Machines [S]

Science

  • Analyze information to construct reasonable explanations from direct and indirect evidence.
  • Build and use a model to solve a mechanical design problem.
  • Collect information by observing and measuring.
  • Communicate valid conclusions.
  • Construct graphs.
  • Construct simple graphs, tables, maps, and charts using tools, including computers, to organize, examine, and evaluate information.
  • Design models to represent the natural world.
  • Determine how people use simple machines to solve problems.
  • Explore simple machines in the community.
  • Identify simple machines that combine to form complex machines.
  • Plan and implement descriptive and simple investigations which include a well-defined question, a testable hypothesis, and proper equipment.

Social Studies

  • Analyze changes that have occurred in communities past and present.
  • Compare how people in different communities adapt to or modify the physical environment to meet their needs.
  • Describe how individuals, events, and ideas change over time.
  • Describe similarities and differences among communities in different times and places.
  • Discuss, describe, and assess ways in which technology is used in homes and communities.
  • Identify the impact of technological change on communities around the world.

Unit 3: Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH [LA]

Language Arts

  • Analyze, compare, and contrast printed and visual information (e.g., graphs, charts, maps).
  • Answer open-ended questions about text.
  • Apply structural analysis to words (i.e., prefixes, suffixes, and syllables).
  • Compose elaborate sentences in written texts and use appropriate end punctuation.
  • Compose sentences with interesting, elaborate subjects.
  • Conduct research on assigned topics using books and technology.
  • Consider a character's point of view.
  • Demonstrate learning and ideas through productions and displays such as reports and murals.
  • Determine the plot, conflict, sequence of events, and resolution of a story.
  • Discuss alternative solutions for a problem in a story.
  • Draw and discuss visual images based on text descriptions.
  • Draw conclusions about characters and events.
  • Draw conclusions, make generalizations, and gather support by referencing the text.
  • Identify abbreviations and acronyms.
  • Identify and describe the setting of stories.
  • Identify and discuss similarities and differences in characters.
  • Identify and interpret elements of fiction and nonfiction.
  • Identify and use the correct spelling of homonyms.
  • Increase vocabulary through word study.
  • Locate information in text for specific purposes.
  • Make inferences and draw conclusions about characters and events.
  • Participate in creative interpretations of stories.
  • Read from a variety of genres (print and electronic) for pleasure and to acquire information.
  • Recognize and apply story structure and text organization.
  • Recognize the differences among genres of literature.
  • Reference the text to determine the plot and sequence of events in a story.
  • Relate characters and their actions to personal experiences and ideas.
  • Respond to fiction by identifying areas for further research.
  • Respond to stories and poems in ways that reflect understanding and interpretation.
  • Share written and oral products in a variety of ways.
  • Summarize main ideas from written or spoken texts using succinct language.
  • Support interpretations or conclusions with examples drawn from text.
  • Use a variety of strategies to organize ideas.
  • Use correct capitalization and punctuation.
  • Use correct irregular plurals, such as "sheep."
  • Use dictionaries to find the meanings of words.
  • Use oral and written language to present information in a sequenced, logical manner.
  • Use prior knowledge to anticipate meaning and make sense of texts.
  • Use singular and plural forms of nouns and adjust verbs for agreement.
  • Use text and personal experiences to verify facts, concepts, and ideas.
  • Write in different forms for different purposes.
  • Write to communicate with a variety of audiences.
  • Write to discover, develop, and refine ideas.
  • Write to record ideas and reflections.

Science

  • Design a way to solve a mechanical problem.
  • Determine how people use simple machines to solve problems.
  • Determine how simple machines are used.
  • Observe and describe the habitats of organisms within an ecosystem.

Social Studies

  • Compare how people in different communities adapt to or modify the physical environment to meet their needs.
  • Discuss, describe, and assess ways in which technology is used in homes and communities.
  • Explore the role of selected fictional characters in creating new communities.
  • Identify the impact of technological change on a community.