Summary of Skills

Age 8-10 - Concept 3: Similarities and Differences

Unit 1: Africa and Asia [SS]

Social Studies

  • Analyze changes which have occurred in communities past and present.
  • Analyze similarities and differences among families in different times and places.
  • Analyze various types of maps and globes.
  • Compare economic and social roles of children and adults in the local community to selected communities around the world.
  • Compare ways in which people in the local community and around the world meet their needs.
  • Describe how individuals, events, and ideas change over time.
  • Describe similarities and differences among communities in different times and in different places.
  • Describe variations in the physical environment including climate, landforms, natural resources, and natural hazards.
  • Identify and compare people's characteristics living in selected regions.
  • Identify and compare the people's characteristics living in selected regions.
  • Recognize diverse leaders, past and present, who demonstrate responsible citizenship.
  • Use appropriate source maps to locate communities.
  • Use geographic terminology to describe variations in the physical environment of communities.

Unit 1: Stories from Africa and Asia [LA]

Language Arts

  • Analyze characters, including their traits, feelings, relationships, and changes.
  • Answer open-ended questions.
  • Compare experiences of characters across cultures.
  • Compose a draft that conveys major ideas and maintains focus on the topic.
  • Compose a variety of written products, including letters.
  • Conduct research by gathering information from a variety of sources.
  • Connect experiences and ideas with those of others through speaking and listening.
  • Connect personal experiences with the life experiences, language, customs, and culture of others.
  • Consider a character's point of view
  • Develop vocabulary through reading.
  • Draw conclusions, make generalizations, and gather support by referencing the text.
  • Extend vocabulary through word study.
  • Identify (with assistance) the purpose, the audience, and the appropriate form for the oral or written assignment.
  • Identify and discuss similarities and differences in events, characters, concepts, and ideas within and across selections and support them by referencing the text.
  • Identify areas of further study when reading text.
  • Identify the conflict in a story.
  • Identify the purpose, audience, and appropriate form for a written task.
  • Interact with text by making predictions and drawing connections.
  • Locate information for specific purposes.
  • Make predictions about text.
  • Practice different kinds of questions and tasks, including test-like comprehension questions.
  • Present information in a sequenced, logical manner.
  • Read from a variety of genres to acquire information.
  • Read independently to build background knowledge.
  • Read orally from familiar texts with fluency (accuracy, expression, appropriate phrasing, and attention to punctuation).
  • Read silently and orally from text.
  • Recognize the number of syllables in a word.
  • Recount or narrate.
  • Relate plot, setting, and characters to own experiences.
  • Represent text information in different ways, including story maps, graphs, and charts.
  • Respond to stories and poems in ways that reflect understanding (in discussion, in writing, and through movement, music, art, and drama).
  • Share information and ideas.
  • Share written, oral, and constructed projects in a variety of ways.
  • Summarize the plot or major events of a story.
  • Sustain conversation on a topic.
  • Use oral and written language to present information in a sequenced, logical manner.
  • Use planning strategies to organize ideas.
  • Use the correct verb tense when writing sentences.
  • Use word reference materials (e.g. dictionary, glossary) to confirm decoding skills, verify spelling, and extend meanings of words.
  • Use written language to report information on a topic.
  • Write in different forms, such as poetry, for different purposes.
  • Write to record ideas and reflections.

Science

  • Differentiate between groups and species of animals.
  • Identify habitats and the living things that exist there.
  • Recognize types of scientists and the jobs that they do.
  • Recognize types of scientists and the jobs they do.

Social Studies

  • Analyze similarities and differences among families in different times and places.
  • Compare traditions that reflect cultures, regions, and customs.
  • Describe similarities and differences among communities in different times and in different places.
  • Distinguish and compare the roles of children and adults in the local community to selected communities around the world.

Unit 2: Rocks and Minerals [S]

Language Arts

  • Make oral and written presentations using visual aids with an awareness of purpose and audience.
  • Use planning strategies to generate topics and organize ideas (e.g., brainstorming, mapping, webbing, reading, discussion).

Science

  • Communicate the uses of rocks and minerals.
  • Conduct tests, compare data, and draw conclusions about physical properties of matter.
  • Describe and evaluate the properties of earth materials.
  • Describe and evaluate the properties of several minerals.
  • Discuss the uses of rocks and minerals.
  • Draw conclusions about past events using fossils or charts and tables.
  • Explain how rocks are composed of minerals.
  • Identify and analyze forces that cause change in landforms over time.
  • Identify and describe the importance of earth materials, including rocks.
  • Identify effects of events and long-term changes including growth, erosion, dissolving, weathering, and flow.
  • Recognize that minerals have a chemical composition and structure, resulting in specific physical properties including hardness, streak color, and magnetism.
  • Show that different rocks and minerals have different properties.

Unit 2: Holes [LA]

Language Arts

  • Analyze characters, including their traits, feelings, relationships, and changes.
  • Compare communication in different forms, such as a dramatic performance and a print version of the same story.
  • Compile notes into outlines, reports, summaries, or other written efforts using available technology.
  • Compose readable text in a variety of forms.
  • Consider a character's point of view.
  • Describe how the setting affects the characters and plot of a story.
  • Draw conclusions, make generalizations, and gather support by referencing the text.
  • Gain new insight into text by using evaluative processes.
  • Identify and describe irony within text and situations.
  • Identify and discuss similarities and differences between concepts and ideas.
  • Identify and discuss similarities and differences in events and characters.
  • Identify relevant questions.
  • Identify similarities and differences among characters and stories.
  • Identify the correct use of homonyms in context.
  • Identify the musical elements of literary language, including rhymes, repeated sounds, or instances of onomatopoeia.
  • Identify the problem, climax, and solution of a story.
  • Know the meaning of simple prefixes and suffixes.
  • Make inferences and draw conclusions about characters.
  • Put story events in proper sequence.
  • Recognize and use adverbs correctly.
  • Recognize and write similes and metaphors.
  • Recognize distinguishing features of familiar genres, including stories, poems, and informational texts.
  • Recognize sentence fragments and run-on sentences.
  • Recognize types of story conflict within novels.
  • Relate plot, setting, and characters to personal experiences.
  • Share written products in a variety of ways.
  • Summarize written text.
  • Take simple notes from relevant sources such as classroom guests, books, and media sources
  • Take simple notes from relevant sources such as classroom guests, books, and media sources.
  • Underline and capitalize book titles.
  • Understand how to use an index and a table of contents within a book.
  • Use correct capitalization and punctuation.
  • Use effective oral communication.
  • Use figurative language in writing.
  • Use logical thinking and reasoning to solve problems.
  • Use oral and written language to answer open-ended questions.
  • Use oral and written language to report information on a topic.
  • Write for a wide variety of audiences.
  • Write in different forms for different purposes such as lists to record, letters to invite or thank, and stories or poems to entertain.
  • Write personal and formal letters that include date, proper salutation, body, closing, and signature.
  • Write to record ideas and reflections.

Science

  • Create models to represent inventions.
  • Identify and discuss different rocks, including their role in geologic formations and distinguishing geologic regions.
  • Identify and record properties of soils such as color and texture, capacity to retain water, and ability to support the growth of plants.
  • Observe and describe how environmental conditions determine how plants survive and grow.
  • Observe and describe the habitats of organisms within an ecosystem.

Social Studies

  • Analyze changes, which have occurred in communities past and present.
  • Describe how individuals, events, and ideas change over time.
  • Describe similarities and differences among communities in different times and places.

Unit 3: Europe [SS]

Social Studies

  • Analyze changes which have occurred in communities past and present.
  • Analyze similarities and differences among environments and communities in different places.
  • Compare ways in which people in the local community and communities around the world meet their needs for government, education, communication, transportation, and recreation.
  • Describe how individuals have contributed to the expansion of communities or the creation of new communities.
  • Describe how individuals, events, and ideas change over time.
  • Describe how individuals, events, and ideas have changed communities over time.
  • Describe similarities and differences among communities in different times and places.
  • Draw maps of places and regions.
  • Explain the significance of selected ethnic or cultural contributions.
  • Identify individual writers and artists and their stories, poems, statues, paintings, and other examples of cultural heritage from communities around the world.
  • Identify reasons people formed communities, including a need for security, law, and material well-being.
  • Recognize historical times in terms of years, decades, and centuries.
  • Use appropriate source maps to locate communities.
  • Use geographic terminology to describe variations in the physical environment as communities.

Unit 3: Stories from Europe [LA]

Language Arts

  • By the end of year, read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, in the grades 4–5 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.
  • Compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated, including the difference between first- and third-person narrations.
  • Demonstrate understanding of words by relating them to their opposites (antonyms) and to words with similar but not identical meanings (synonyms).
  • Differentiate between contexts that call for formal English (e.g., presenting ideas) and situations where informal discourse is appropriate (e.g., small-group discussion).
  • Explain events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text.
  • Form and use prepositional phrases.
  • Introduce a topic or text clearly, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure in which related ideas are grouped to support the writer's purpose.
  • Make connections between the text of a story or drama and a visual or oral presentation of the text, identifying where each version reflects specific descriptions and directions in the text.
  • Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally.
  • Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
  • Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events.
  • Read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, in the grades 4–5 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.
  • Recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant information from print and digital sources; take notes and categorize information, and provide a list of sources.
  • Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
  • Use a comma before a coordinating conjunction in a compound sentence.
  • Use a comma to separate items in a series and to separate equal adjectives.
  • Use concrete words and phrases and sensory details to convey experiences and events precisely.
  • Use dialogue and description to develop experiences and events or show the responses of characters to situations.
  • With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing.
  • Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.