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Summary of Skills

Age 8-10 - Concept 1: Interdependence

Unit 1: Dirt and Plants [S]

Language Arts

  • Compose a variety of fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama selections.
  • Use oral and written language to present information in a sequenced, logical manner.

Science

  • Investigate and describe how plants pass through distinct stages in their life cycle including growth, survival, and reproduction.
  • Analyze and interpret information to construct reasonable explanations from direct and indirect evidence.
  • Communicate valid conclusions.
  • Conduct science experiments and investigations.
  • Determine how composting recycles discarded plant and animal material.
  • Determine the ability of soil to support the growth of many plants, including those important to our food supply.
  • Determine the relationship between heat and decaying plant matter in a compost pile.
  • Explain why the number of seeds a plant produces depends on variables such as light, water, nutrients, and pollination.
  • Follow the scientific method.
  • Identify and describe the life cycle of living things.
  • Identify and describe the process of photosynthesis.
  • Identify and record properties of soils such as color, texture, capacity to retain water, and ability to support the growth of plants.
  • Identify plant products and their importance.
  • Identify the basic components of soil: sand, clay, and humus.
  • Investigate and observe that different soils absorb water at different rates.
  • Observe and describe how environmental conditions determine how plants survive and grow in a particular environment.
  • Observe and describe the properties of soil: color, texture, and capacity to hold water.
  • Observe and discuss how bees pollinate flowers.
  • Observe and measure how the quantities and qualities of nutrients, light, and water in the environment affect plant growth.
  • Observe, describe, and record properties of germinating seeds.
  • Recognize the impact of the environment on living things.

Unit 1: Little House in the Big Woods [LA]

Language Arts

  • Adapt speech communication to the audience, purpose, and occasion.
  • Analyze characters, including their traits, feelings, relationships, and the changes they experience.
  • Compare a dramatic performance with a print version of the same story.
  • Compare language and oral traditions (family stories) that reflect customs, regions, and cultures.
  • Compose a draft of preliminary plans that conveys major ideas and maintains focus on a topic.
  • Compose a variety of fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama selections on given topics.
  • Conduct research (with assistance) for assigned and self-selected projects from a variety of sources.
  • Connect own experiences with the experiences, language, customs, and culture of others through speaking and listening.
  • Consider the difference between fiction and nonfiction using interpretive, critical, and evaluative processes.
  • Demonstrate learning through productions and displays such as reports, illustrations, and dramatizations.
  • Demonstrate understanding by using a variety of complete sentences (declarative, imperative, interrogative, and exclamatory) in writing and speaking.
  • Draw conclusions from gathered information.
  • Draw conclusions, make generalizations, and gather support by referencing the text.
  • Identify (with assistance) the purpose, audience, and appropriate format for an oral presentation.
  • Identify and discuss similarities and differences in events, characters, and concepts across selections and support them by referencing the text.
  • Increase reading and writing vocabulary through word study.
  • Interact with the text before, during, and after reading by asking questions.
  • Interact with the text by making connections, answering questions, and locating information.
  • Interpret, create, and use graphic sources of information, including maps, charts, graphs, and diagrams.
  • Organize information using notes, charts, and labels.
  • Produce work that follows the conventions of a particular genre (e.g., personal narrative, short report, friendly letter, directions, and instructions).
  • Proofread writing and correct most misspellings independently with reference to resources.
  • Read aloud grade-appropriate text with fluency, comprehension, and expression.
  • Read independently.
  • Recognize the difference between fact and opinion.
  • Relate plot, setting, and characters to own experiences and ideas.
  • Respond to fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama using interpretive and evaluative processes.
  • Respond to text by reflecting on learning, gaining new insights, and identifying areas for further study.
  • Share an oral project through presentation.
  • Share written and oral products.
  • Summarize main ideas from written or spoken texts, using succinct language.
  • Use correct capitalization in writing.
  • Use oral and written language to answer open-ended questions.
  • Use oral and written language to present information in a sequenced, logical manner in order to support the following skills: discuss and sustain conversation on a topic, share information and ideas, recount or narrate, and share written and oral products in a variety of ways.
  • Use planning strategies to organize ideas.
  • Use story structure and text organization to comprehend text.
  • Use word reference materials (e.g., dictionary, glossary) to confirm decoding skills, verify spelling, and extend meanings of words.
  • Write with more proficient spellings of inflectional endings, including plurals, past tense, and words that drop the final "e" when -ing, -ed, or -able are added.

Unit 2: Native Americans [SS]

Social Studies

  • Analyze changes that have occurred in communities past and present.
  • Analyze similarities and differences among families in different times and places.
  • Analyze similarities and differences among people in different times and in different places.
  • Compare how people in different communities adapt to or modify the physical environment to meet their needs.
  • Compare the ways of life of Native-American groups in the Western Hemisphere.
  • Create maps to reflect information about the environment.
  • Describe and compare cultural characteristics of regional tribes and evaluate their significance.
  • Describe how individuals, events, and ideas change over time.
  • Describe how individuals, events, and ideas have changed communities over time.
  • Describe similarities and differences among communities in different times and in different places.
  • Describe the similarities and differences among people of North America, past and present.
  • Describe traditional art, music, and craft forms of the Native American tribes.
  • Explain cultural traditions in Native American communities.
  • Explain the economic patterns of various early Native-American groups.
  • Explain the need for leaders in communities and describe their roles and responsibilities.
  • Identify Native American groups in the Western Hemisphere before European exploration and describe the regions in which they lived.
  • Locate and describe Native Americans in North America, past and present.
  • Use appropriate source maps to locate communities.
  • Use geographic terminology to describe variations in the physical environment.
  • Use maps to locate communities.
  • Use vocabulary related to chronology.

Unit 2: The Sign of the Beaver [LA]

Language Arts

  • Accurately use capitalization and punctuation, such as commas, in writing.
  • Analyze characters, including their traits, feelings, relationships, and changes.
  • Answer open-ended questions related to a text.
  • Compose a draft that conveys major ideas and maintains focus on the topic by using preliminary plans.
  • Compose a variety of literary genres, including fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama, using self-selected topics and forms.
  • Compose elaborate written sentences and use appropriate end punctuation.
  • Conduct research for assigned and self-selected projects from a variety of sources.
  • Connect his or her own experiences with others' life experiences, languages, customs, and cultures.
  • Determine the author's purpose, plot, conflict, sequence of events, resolution, and theme of a text.
  • Draw and discuss visual images based on text descriptions.
  • Edit writing for standard grammar and usage.
  • Focus reflection and revision (with assistance) by clarifying ideas, adding descriptive words and phrases, sequencing events and ideas, and strengthening word choice.
  • Identify (with assistance) the purpose, the audience, and the appropriate form for an oral or written task.
  • Identify and discuss similarities and differences in events, characters, and ideas among selections and support them by referencing the text.
  • Identify and interpret elements of fiction and nonfiction.
  • Identify cause and effect patterns found in text.
  • Identify parts of speech within a sentence.
  • Identify root words, prefixes, and suffixes.
  • Identify similarities and differences such as in topics, characters, and themes in texts.
  • Increase vocabulary through word study.
  • Interact with text by making connections.
  • Practice different kinds of questions and tasks.
  • Present dramatic interpretations of experiences, stories, poems, or plays.
  • Produce work that follows the conventions of particular genres.
  • Read fiction and nonfiction texts.
  • Recognize correct sentence structure.
  • Relate plot, character, and setting to own experiences.
  • Respond to fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama using interpretive, critical, and evaluative processes by participating in creative interpretations.
  • Respond to stories and poems in ways that reflect understanding and interpretation in discussion, writing, and through art.
  • Respond to text by reflecting on learning, gaining new insights, and identifying areas for further study.
  • Share written and oral products in a variety of ways.
  • Summarize main ideas from written or spoken texts using succinct language.
  • Support interpretations or conclusions with examples from text.
  • Use oral and written language to share information and ideas.
  • Use prepositions and prepositional phrases in writing.
  • Use text and own experiences to verify facts, concepts, and ideas.
  • Use word reference materials such as a dictionary or glossary to confirm decoding skills, verify spelling, and extend meanings of words.

Science

  • Explain what people can learn from observing the habits of animals.

Social Studies

  • Compare how people in different communities adapt to or modify the physical environment to meet their needs.

Unit 3: Ecosystems and Ecology [S]

Science

  • Describe environmental changes in which some organisms would thrive, become ill, or perish.
  • Describe how living organisms are dependent on their environment to meet their needs.
  • Describe how organisms modify their physical environment to meet their needs.
  • Examine ways people can protect the environment.
  • Identify and describe the importance of Earth's materials.
  • Identify ways living organisms are dependent on other organisms within their environment.
  • Observe and describe the habitats of organisms within an ecosystem.
  • Observe and identify organisms with similar needs that compete with one another for resources such as oxygen, water, food, or space.
  • Represent the natural world using models.

Social Studies

  • Explain variations in the physical environment including climate, landforms, natural resources, and natural hazards.

Unit 3: Native American Animal Stories [LA]

Language Arts

  • Choose and adapt spoken language appropriate to the audience, purpose, and occasion, including use of appropriate volume and rate.
  • Compare experiences of characters across cultures.
  • Compare language and oral traditions (stories) that reflect customs, regions, and cultures.
  • Compose sentences with interesting, elaborate subjects.
  • Demonstrate understanding by using a variety of complete sentences.
  • Develop drafts.
  • Edit writing for standard grammar and usage, including subject-verb agreement.
  • Generate ideas for writing by using pre-writing techniques such as drawing and making lists.
  • Identify similarities and differences across texts in topics, characters, and themes.
  • Identify the conflict and resolution of a story.
  • Identify the importance of the setting to a story's meaning
  • Increase knowledge of other cultures by reading stories from around the world.
  • Locate information from text for specific purposes.
  • Make inferences and draw conclusions based on events in the story.
  • Participate in creative interpretations of stories.
  • Present dramatic interpretations of experiences, stories, poems, or plays.
  • Recognize the distinguishing features of familiar genres, including myths and folktales.
  • Recognize the problem or plot of a story.
  • Record and recognize synonyms and antonyms for words.
  • Reflect on learning, gain new insights from text, and identify areas for further study.
  • Respond to fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama using interpretive and evaluative processes.
  • Retell a spoken message by summarizing or clarifying.
  • Understand literary forms by distinguishing among stories, poems, myths, legends, and folktales.
  • Use capitalization with proper nouns and punctuation, such as commas, in a series.
  • Use correct subject/verb agreement.
  • Use relative pronouns (who, whose, whom, which, that) and relative adverbs (where, when, why).
  • Use singular and plural forms of regular nouns and adjust verbs for agreement.
  • Use written language to report information on a topic.
  • Write in different forms for different purposes.

Social Studies

  • Analyze similarities and differences among families in different times and in different places.
  • Describe similarities and differences among communities in different times and in different places.