Summary of Skills

Age 7-9 - Concept 1: Environment

Unit 1: Amazing Weather [S]

Science

  • Describe weather using quantitative measures of temperature, wind direction, wind speed, and precipitation.
  • Discuss and determine how energy from the Sun warms the land, air, and water.
  • Gather information using simple equipment and tools.
  • Give examples of ways living organisms depend on their environments.
  • Identify and use common tools to measure weather: wind vane (wind direction), anemometer (wind velocity), thermometer, and rain gauge.
  • Identify characteristics of living organisms.
  • Identify external characteristics of plants and animals that allow them to meet their needs.
  • Identify how natural hazards impact communities.
  • Investigate and describe how moving air interacts with objects.
  • Observe and record changes in weather and season.
  • Observe and record the function of animal and plant parts.
  • Observe and record weather changes over time and relate to time of day and year.
  • Observe the force of air pressure pushing on objects.

Social Studies

  • Interpret maps, charts, and pictures of locations.
  • Define geography and use geographic terms to describe landforms, bodies of water, weather, and climate.
  • Describe the role of a geographer and apply geographic tools such as maps, globes, compasses, and photographs in the understanding of places and regions.
  • Identify and describe the people, vegetation, and animal life specific to certain regions and describe their interdependence.
  • Identify major landforms and bodies of water.
  • Identify the absolute and relative locations of communities.
  • Use symbols, find locations, and determine direction using maps and globes.

Unit 1: Tornado [LA]

Language Arts

  • Compare language and oral traditions from different cultures.
  • Compare similarities and differences between oneself and another.
  • Connect and compare information within and across selections (fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama) to personal experience and knowledge.
  • Discuss meanings of words and develop vocabulary through meaningful experiences.
  • Draw and discuss visual images based on text description.
  • Examine author's decisions and word choice.
  • Explain and describe new concepts and information in own words (e.g., plot, setting, major events, characters, author's message, connections, topic, key vocabulary, key concepts, text features).
  • Identify elements of fiction by determining plot, sequence, and resolution.
  • Increase oral and written vocabulary by listening, discussing, and composing texts when responding to literature that is read and heard.
  • Locate and discuss examples of an author's use of declarative, interrogative, and exclamatory sentences.
  • Locate information about a topic.
  • Make inferences and draw conclusions from a text.
  • Make predictions about events in a story.
  • Produce a summary of a text.
  • Read and comprehend figurative language in text.
  • Read classic and contemporary works.
  • Read critically to interpret and evaluate.
  • Read expository materials for answers to specific questions.
  • Read independently.
  • Read orally with fluency.
  • Recall main ideas, facts, and details from a text.
  • Recognize distinguishing features of stories.
  • Represent text information in different ways including story maps, charts, and graphs.
  • Retell a story or parts of a story.
  • Retell or act out the order of important events in a story.
  • Write sentences with subjects and verbs.
  • Write to communicate with an audience.

Science

  • Describe weather.

Social Studies

  • Analyze environmental issues and their impact on culture.

Unit 2: The Land [S]

Social Studies

  • Cite ways people modify the physical environment to meet their needs.
  • Define geography and use geographic terms to describe landforms, bodies of water, weather, and climate.
  • Describe the role of a geographer and apply geographic tools such as maps, globes, compasses, and photographs in the understanding of locations and characteristics of places and regions.
  • Describe the role of a geographer and apply geographic tools, such as maps, globes, compasses, and photographs in the understanding of locations and characteristics of places and regions.
  • Explain how people depend on the environment to meet certain needs.
  • Identify and describe the people, vegetation, and animal life specific to certain regions and describe their interdependence.
  • Identify changes in the environment.
  • Identify natural resources and cite ways to conserve and replenish natural resources.
  • Identify the absolute and relative location of communities.

Unit 2: Sarah, Plain and Tall [LA]

Language Arts

  • Attend to spelling, mechanics, and format for final products in one's own writing.
  • Begin writing more complex sentences in addition to simple sentences.
  • Compare and contrast characters within a book.
  • Compose first drafts.
  • Connect ideas from a text to personal experiences.
  • Demonstrate understanding of informational text.
  • Describe the plot of a story.
  • Develop vocabulary through reading.
  • Discuss main ideas, facts, and details from a text.
  • Discuss the effect of an author's choices for nouns, verbs, modifiers, and specific vocabulary to help the reader comprehend a narrative or expository text.
  • Edit and correct word order in sentences.
  • Explain and describe characters in own words.
  • Explain and describe new concepts and information in own words | plot, setting, characters, and theme.
  • Explain and describe new concepts and information in own words|plot, setting, characters, and theme.
  • Explain and describe the setting of a story.
  • Identify a theme in a story.
  • Locate main ideas, facts, and details in a text.
  • Locate specific information within text.
  • Make inferences and draw conclusions.
  • Make predictions about a text.
  • Plan and make judgments about what to include in written products.
  • Practice the correct spelling of words.
  • Present dramatic interpretations of experiences, stories, poems, or plays.
  • Read expository materials to answer questions and locate information.
  • Read independently for extended periods of time.
  • Recall main ideas, facts, and details from a text.
  • Retell written messages by clarifying or summarizing.
  • Use capitalization, punctuation, and paragraphs in own writing.
  • Use correct word order in sentences.
  • Use editing to check and confirm correct use of conventions.
  • Use expanded vocabulary to generate synonyms for commonly used words in written and oral communication.
  • Use graphic sources of information such as maps.
  • Use personal experiences and knowledge to interpret written and oral messages.
  • Use resources such as dictionaries and context clues to develop word meaning.
  • Use the following parts of the sentence: subject, predicate, and modifier.
  • Write structured narratives when given help with organization.
  • Write structured narratives when given help with organization. Write structured, informative narratives.
  • Write structured, informative narratives.

Social Studies

  • Describe human movement in the establishment of settlement patterns.
  • Identify and describe attributes of responsible citizenship.
  • Identify natural resources and how they are used.

Unit 3: Sound [S]

Science

  • Compare results of investigations with what students know about the world.
  • Construct reasonable explanations and draw conclusions.
  • Demonstrate how sound is produced by vibrating objects and vibrating columns of air.
  • Describe how sounds travel through different materials.
  • Identify, predict, replicate, and create patterns.
  • Observe and describe how sounds are made by using a variety of instruments and other sound-makers, including human vocal cords.
  • Observe and record functions of animal parts.
  • Plan and conduct simple investigations.
  • Sequence organisms, objects, and events.
  • Show how altering the size and shape of a variety of instruments can change frequency.
  • Show how frequency can be changed by altering the rate of the vibration.
  • Show how the human ear detects sound with a membrane that vibrates when sound reaches it.

Unit 3: Who Was Helen Keller? [LA]

Language Arts

  • Attend to spelling, mechanics, and format for final products in one's own writing.
  • Compare language and oral traditions that reflect different people and customs.
  • Compose first drafts.
  • Connect and compare information within and across selections (fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama) to experience and knowledge.
  • Create a readable document.
  • Describe concepts and information in own words.
  • Develop and use new vocabulary.
  • Discuss similarities and differences in events, characters, and concepts within and across texts.
  • Discuss the effect of an author's choices for nouns, verbs, modifiers, and specific vocabulary, which help the reader comprehend a narrative or expository text.
  • Distinguish fiction from nonfiction.
  • Generate ideas for writing by listing key thoughts.
  • Increase oral and written vocabulary by listening, discussing, and composing texts when responding to literature that is read and heard.
  • Interpret information from diagrams, charts, and maps.
  • Locate and use important areas of the library.
  • Make predictions about text.
  • Plan and make judgments about what to include in written and oral products.
  • Pose possible how, why, and what if questions to understand and interpret text.
  • Read aloud with fluency and expression any text appropriate for early independent readers.
  • Read and comprehend text by locating information for specific purposes.
  • Read classic and contemporary work.
  • Read expository materials for answers to specific questions.
  • Recall main ideas, facts, and details from a text.
  • Reread drafts for meaning and revise.
  • Respond to stories in ways that reflect understanding through writing, music, drama, and art.
  • Use capitalization, punctuation, and paragraphs in own writing.
  • Use editing to check for complete sentences and word order.
  • Use legible handwriting.
  • Use media and technology to enhance the presentation of information to an audience for a specific purpose.
  • Use text for a variety of functions including informational.
  • Use verbal and nonverbal communication.
  • Write structured, informative presentations and narratives when given help with organization.
  • Write to communicate with a variety of audiences.

Contact

Moving Beyond the Page
3548 Shoshoni Ct
College Station, TX 77845
(888) 316-8242
info@movingbeyondthepage.com
Copyright ©2005-2017 Epiphany Curriculum, LLC