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The Power of People
Age 8-10: Concept 2 - Force and Power: Unit 2

Identify important local and national leaders. Appreciate the power of voting and the election process. Recognize the contributions of Americans in the past that have used their power to make a difference. Research a citizen from the past and create your own wax museum exhibit.

This unit can be used independently but is designed to be taught in conjunction with the literature unit for The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis.

Other Items You May Need

The Age 8-10 social studies units utilize a laminated timeline poster to enhance your child's understanding of the chronology of historical events.
$4.99 #332 8-10 Timeline

Prerequisites

  • Able to read and comprehend chapter books at a 4th or 5th grade reading level
  • Able to write an organized paragraph
  • Usually used by children in third or fourth grade

Table of Contents

  • Lesson 1: Local Government
  • Lesson 2: The Federal Government (2 Days)
  • Lesson 3: Power of the People (2 Days)
  • Lesson 4: Citizenship (2 Days)
  • Lesson 5: Powerful People of the Past (3 Days)
  • Final Project: A Visit to the Wax Museum (2 Days)

Summary of Skills

Moving Beyond the Page is based on state and national standards. These standards are covered in this unit.
  • Cite examples of nonprofit or civic organizations such as the Red Cross and explain how they serve the common good. (Social Studies)
  • Demonstrate characteristics of responsible citizenship and explain how citizen participation can impact changes within a community. (Social Studies)
  • Demonstrate characteristics of responsible citizenship. (Social Studies)
  • Describe the basic structure of government in the local community. (Social Studies)
  • Explain how citizen participation can impact changes within a community. (Social Studies)
  • Explain how local government services are financed. (Social Studies)
  • Explain the importance of acts of civic responsibility, including obeying laws and voting. (Social Studies)
  • Explain the need for leaders in communities and describe their roles and responsibilities. (Social Studies)
  • Give examples of community changes that result from individual or group contributions. (Social Studies)
  • Identify characteristics of good citizenship such as a belief in justice, truth, equality, and responsibility for the common good. (Social Studies)
  • Identify government officials and explain how they are chosen. (Social Studies)
  • Identify historic figures who have exemplified good citizenship. (Social Studies)
  • Identify local government officials and explain how they are chosen. (Social Studies)
  • Identify people who exemplify good citizenship. (Social Studies)
  • Identify services commonly provided by local governments. (Social Studies)
  • Recognize diverse local, state, and national leaders, past and present, who demonstrate responsible citizenship. (Social Studies)
  • Recognize local, state, and national leaders, past and present, who demonstrate responsible citizenship. (Social Studies)
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Contact

Moving Beyond the Page
317 S. Broadway St
Linton, ND 58552
(888) 316-8242
[email protected]
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