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Elijah of Buxton
Age 12-14: Concept 1 - Semester 1: Unit 5

Follow the adventures of Elijah Freeman -- a young African-American boy born free in Canada -- as he travels to the United States in pursuit of a thief. Witness Elijah's first encounters with the horror of slavery and his growing understanding of and appreciation for his own freedom. During the process of reading this book, you will also learn the names and definitions of important literary terms, such as tone, metaphor, conflict, and climax. These will help you identify the basic elements of narratives necessary to interpret, critique, and respond to literature.

For the final project in this unit, you will have the opportunity to create your own personal, first-person narrative using the literary techniques you have just learned.
by Kim A. Howe, M.S., Kelly Kirk
 
by Kim A. Howe, M.S., Kelly Kirk
 

Prerequisites

  • Able to read and comprehend novels at an 8th or 9th grade reading level
  • Able to write multiple paragraphs on a topic
  • Can write a five paragraph essay
  • Usually used by children in the seventh or eighth grade

Table of Contents

  • Lesson 1: Introduction to the Novel (2 Days)
  • Lesson 2: The Preacher
  • Lesson 3: Creating a Character
  • Lesson 4: Tone and Mood
  • Lesson 5: Colorful Language
  • Lesson 6: Symbolism
  • Lesson 7: The Importance of Education
  • Lesson 8: Transitions and Characters
  • Lesson 9: Transitions and Humor
  • Lesson 10: Allusions and Authors
  • Lesson 11: Story Reflections
  • Final Project: Personal Narrative (2 Days)

Summary of Skills

Moving Beyond the Page is based on state and national standards. These standards are covered in this unit.
  • Analyze how a modern work of fiction draws on themes, patterns of events, or character types from myths, traditional stories, or religious works such as the Bible, including describing how the material is rendered new. (Language Arts)
  • Analyze the effects of elements such as plot, theme, characterization, style, mood, and tone. (Language Arts)
  • Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning or its part of speech. (Language Arts)
  • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts. (Language Arts)
  • Discuss how authors develop character in writing: character traits, physical appearance, character quotes, thoughts and actions of other characters toward the character. (Language Arts)
  • Discuss the effects of such literary devices as flashback, allusion, irony, and symbolism. (Language Arts)
  • Employ narrative and descriptive strategies that use relevant dialogue, specific action, physical description, background description, comparison or contrast of characters. (Language Arts)
  • Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and point of view and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically. (Language Arts)
  • In narrative writing, use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to capture the action and convey experiences in events. (Language Arts)
  • Interpret figures of speech (e.g. verbal irony, puns) in context. (Language Arts)
  • Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on the narrated experiences or events. (Language Arts)
  • Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence, signal shifts from one time frame or setting to another, and show the relationships among experiences and events. (Language Arts)
  • Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence or paragraph; a words position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase. (Language Arts)
  • Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, and reflection, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters. (Language Arts)
  • Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to capture the action and convey experiences and events. (Language Arts)
  • Use remembered feelings, select details that best illuminate the topic, and connect events to self/society. (Language Arts)
  • Write biographies, autobiographies, short stories, or narratives that relate a clear, coherent incident, event, or situation by using well-chosen details, reveal the significance of, or the writer's attitude about the subject. (Language Arts)
  • Write biographies, autobiographies, short stories, or narratives that relate a clear, coherent incident, event, or situation by using well-chosen details, reveal the significance of, or the writer's attitude about, the subject, and employ narrative and descriptive strategies. (Language Arts)
  • Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences. (Language Arts)
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Contact

Moving Beyond the Page
317 S. Broadway St
Linton, ND 58552
(888) 316-8242
[email protected]
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