Revolution
Age 12-14: Concept 1 - Semester 1: Unit 1

In this historical unit, you will read about the earliest days of the colonization of North America leading up to the independence movement and the formation of the United States of America. You will begin by learning about the founding of the colonies and the main reasons why people chose to leave Europe for North America. This unit also covers important historical events like the landing of the Mayflower as well as the types of colonies and the differences among the economies of the northern, middle, and southern colonies. You will also study and read about the system of taxation that led to the American Revolution including key historical events like the Boston Tea Party. Towards the end of the unit, you will discover the history of the formation of the independence movement, the writing of the Declaration of Independence, and the ending of the American Revolution at the Battle of Yorktown.

For the final project, you will teach others about this period in history by dressing up as a historical figure, set in a specific colony, to dramatize the life of that individual. This living history presentation can be combined with the language arts unit on Abigail Adams to create a larger final project performance.
by Kathryn L. Wall, Ph.D.
 
by Kathryn L. Wall, Ph.D.
 
 

Other Items You May Need

The Age 12-14 social studies units utilize a Timeline of American History along with a stack of timeline cards to enhance your child's understanding of the chronology of historical events.
$15.00 #1809 Age 12-14 - American History Timeline Cards
$7.00 #1810 Age 12-14 - American History Timeline

Prerequisites

  • Able to read and comprehend novels at an 8th or 9th grade reading level
  • Able to write multiple paragraphs on a topic
  • Can write a five-paragraph essay
  • Usually used by children in the seventh or eighth grade

Table of Contents

  • Lesson 1: Founding of the Colonies
  • Lesson 2: Southern Colonies (2 Days)
  • Lesson 3: The Middle and Northern Colonies (2 Days)
  • Lesson 4: Daily Life in the Colonies
  • Lesson 5: Town and Country
  • Lesson 6: Leading Up to Revolution (2 Days)
  • Lesson 7: Independence
  • Lesson 8: Fighting the War (2 Days)
  • Lesson 9: A New Nation
  • Final Project: Living History (2 Days)

Summary of Skills

Moving Beyond the Page is based on state and national standards. These standards are covered in this unit.
  • Analyze how the American Revolution affected other nations, especially France. (Social Studies)
  • Analyze the important geographic, political, economic, and social aspects of life in the region prior to the Revolutionary Period. (Social Studies)
  • Assess the impact of geography on the settlement and developing economy of the Carolina colony. (Social Studies)
  • Compare political, economic, religious, and social reasons for the establishment of the 13 English colonies. (Social Studies)
  • Describe how religion and virtue contributed to the growth of representative government in the American colonies. (Social Studies)
  • Describe the contributions of key personalities from the Revolutionary War era and assess their influence on the outcome of the war including Abigail Adams, John Adams, Wentworth Cheswell, Samuel Adams, Mercy Otis Warren, James Armistead, Benjamin Franklin, Bernardo de Gálvez, Crispus Attucks, King George III, Haym Salomon, Patrick Henry, Thomas Jefferson, the Marquis de Lafayette, Thomas Paine, and George Washington. (Social Studies)
  • Describe the contributions of key personalities from the Revolutionary War era and assess their influence on the outcome of the war — including Abigail Adams, John Adams, Wentworth Cheswell, Samuel Adams, Mercy Otis Warren, James Armistead, Benjamin Franklin, Bernardo de Gálvez, Crispus Attucks, King George III, Haym Salomon, Patrick Henry, Thomas Jefferson, the Marquis de Lafayette, Thomas Paine, and George Washington. (Social Studies)
  • Describe the factors that led to the founding and settlement of the American colonies including religious persecution, economic opportunity, adventure, and forced migration. (Social Studies)
  • Describe the impact of documents such as the Mecklenburg Resolves, the Halifax Resolves, the Albany Plan of Union, the Declaration of Independence, the State Constitution of 1776, the Articles of Confederation, the United States Constitution, and the Bill of Rights on the formation of the state and national governments. (Social Studies)
  • Describe the relationship between the moral and political ideas of the Great Awakening and the development of revolutionary fervor. (Social Studies)
  • Describe the relationship between the moral and political ideas of the Great Awakening and the development of revolutionary fervor. Describe how religion and virtue contributed to the growth of representative government in the American colonies. (Social Studies)
  • Describe the roles and contributions of diverse groups, such as American Indians, African Americans, European immigrants, landed gentry, tradesmen, and small farmers to everyday life in various colonies. (Social Studies)
  • Evaluate the impact of the Columbian Exchange on the cultures of American Indians, Europeans, and Africans. (Social Studies)
  • Examine the reasons for the colonists' victory over the British, and evaluate the impact of military successes and failures, the role of foreign interventions, and ongoing political and economic domestic issues. (Social Studies)
  • Examine the role of an individual state or region in the Revolutionary War. (Social Studies)
  • Explain the issues surrounding important events of the American Revolution, including declaring independence; writing the Articles of Confederation; fighting the battles of Lexington, Concord, Saratoga, and Yorktown; enduring the winter at Valley Forge; and signing the Treaty of Paris of 1783. (Social Studies)
  • Identify and describe American Indians who inhabited various colonies and assess their impacts on those colonies. (Social Studies)
  • Identify geographic and political reasons for the creation of various colonies and evaluate the effects on the government and economics of the colony. (Social Studies)
  • Trace the causes and effects of the Revolutionary War, and assess the impact of major events, problems, and personalities during the Constitutional Period in individual states and the new nation. (Social Studies)
  • Trace the events leading up to the Revolutionary War and evaluate their relative significance in the onset of hostilities, including the Proclamation of 1763, the Intolerable Acts, the Stamp Act, mercantilism, lack of representation in Parliament, and British economic policies following the French and Indian War. (Social Studies)
  • Understand significant political and economic issues of the revolutionary era. (Social Studies)
  • Understand the causes of exploration and identify reasons for European exploration and colonization of North America. (Social Studies)
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