PURCHASE

The Hobbit
Age 11-13: Concept 1 - Semester 1: Unit 3

Can even the smallest of creatures go up against the likes of elves, goblins, dragons, and kings, and affect or alter the direction of an entire world? This classic novel by J.R.R. Tolkien follows the adventures of the diminutive Hobbit, Bilbo Baggins, as he is swept up in an adventure to save Middle Earth from destruction. This story reveals the importance of friendship, perseverance, and hope, while immersing you in a fantastical, action-packed, and magical world.

This unit will provide you with the opportunity to learn about the author and the unique creatures he created. During this process, you will study new vocabulary, sentence construction and grammar, and literary terms and techniques. You will also learn about the characteristics typical of fantasy novels and quest stories.

For the final project, you will practice using your own voice to respond to literature. This will involve constructing an argument, supported by evidence, that defends your understanding or interpretation of the novel and how it reflects or comments on life.

Prerequisites

  • Able to read and comprehend novels at a late 7th or 8th grade reading level
  • Able to write multiple paragraphs on a topic
  • Familiar with the five-paragraph essay

Table of Contents

  • Lesson 1: Bilbo Baggins
  • Lesson 2: Trolls
  • Lesson 3: The Elves
  • Lesson 4: Gollum
  • Lesson 5: Wolves, Goblins, and Eagles
  • Lesson 6: Skin-Changer
  • Lesson 7: Spiders
  • Lesson 8: Elvenking
  • Lesson 9: Men of the Lake
  • Lesson 10: The Dragon
  • Lesson 11: Bard
  • Lesson 12: The Arkenstone
  • Lesson 13: The Battle
  • Final Project: Responding to Literature (3 Days)

Summary of Skills

Moving Beyond the Page is based on state and national standards. These standards are covered in this unit.
  • Analyze a range of responses to a literary work and determine the extent to which the literary elements in the work shaped those responses. (Language Arts)
  • Analyze characterization as delineated through the narrator's description. (Language Arts)
  • Analyze the effects of figurative language. (Language Arts)
  • Analyze the effects of such elements as plot, theme, point of view, characterization, mood, and style. (Language Arts)
  • Clarify word meanings through the use of definition, example, restatement, or contrast. (Language Arts)
  • Construct and present book/media reviews. (Language Arts)
  • Construct essays/presentations that respond to a given problem by proposing a solution that includes relevant details. (Language Arts)
  • Demonstrate an understanding of conventional written and spoken expression by using a variety of sentence types correctly, punctuating them properly, and avoiding fragments and run-ons. (Language Arts)
  • Demonstrate an understanding of conventional written and spoken expression by using a variety of sentence types correctly, punctuating them properly, and avoiding fragments. (Language Arts)
  • Demonstrate an understanding of conventional written and spoken expression by using a variety of sentence types correctly, punctuating them properly, and avoiding run-ons. (Language Arts)
  • Demonstrate an understanding of conventional written and spoken expression by using clauses correctly. (Language Arts)
  • Describe conventions in myths and epic tales (e.g., extended simile, the quest, the hero's tasks, circle stories). (Language Arts)
  • Describe multiple themes in a work of fiction. (Language Arts)
  • Determine how personal circumstances and backgrounds shape interaction with text. (Language Arts)
  • Determine the figurative meaning of phrases and analyze how an author's use of language creates imagery, appeals to the senses, and suggests mood. (Language Arts)
  • Determine the meaning of unfamiliar vocabulary words using context clues (Language Arts)
  • Draw inferences and conclusions about informational materials that are read, heard, or viewed. (Language Arts)
  • Experiment with figurative language and speech patterns. (Language Arts)
  • Extend vocabulary knowledge by learning and using new words. (Language Arts)
  • Give appropriate reasons that support opinions of literature. (Language Arts)
  • Identify and analyze recurring themes across works. (Language Arts)
  • Identify and use transitions for sentence-to-sentence coherence. (Language Arts)
  • Identify events that advance the plot and determine how each event explains past or present actions or foreshadows future action. (Language Arts)
  • Identify semicolons and use them correctly. (Language Arts)
  • Identify, analyze, and critique persuasive techniques (e.g., promises, dares, flattery, glittering generalities.) (Language Arts)
  • Identify, use, and understand the function of subordinating conjunctions in the context of reading, writing, and speaking. (Language Arts)
  • Respond to informational materials by summarizing information and determining the importance of information. (Language Arts)
  • Respond to informational materials that are read, heard, and/or viewed by monitoring comprehension for understanding of what is read, heard and/or viewed. (Language Arts)
  • Study problems and solutions within various texts and situations. (Language Arts)
  • Use a thesaurus to alternate word choices. (Language Arts)
  • Use commas when linking two clauses with a conjunction in compound sentences. (Language Arts)
  • Use dependent and independent clauses correctly, including proper punctuation. (Language Arts)
  • Use figurative language in own writing. (Language Arts)
  • Use semicolons to connect independent clauses. (Language Arts)
  • Use simple, compound, and complex sentences; use effective coordination and subordination of ideas to express complete thoughts. (Language Arts)
  • Utilize the problem-solution process within various contexts/situations. (Language Arts)
  • Write complex sentences and differentiate between main versus subordinate clauses. (Language Arts)
  • Write descriptive text in the fantasy genre. (Language Arts)
<-- go back