Weather and Climate
Age 10-12: Concept 1 - Environment and Cycles: Unit 1

Explore different kinds of weather. Build tools to measure weather conditions and keep a weather journal. Learn about weather maps and weather forecasts, and try predicting the weather in your area. Conduct demonstrations to model air pressure, weather fronts, and lightning. Investigate global and local climates and climate change. For the final project, give an oral or written presentation highlighting what you've learned in the unit.

Prerequisites

  • Able to read and comprehend novels at a late 6th or 7th grade reading level
  • Able to write multiple paragraphs on a topic
  • Familiar with the five-paragraph essay
  • Usually used by children in the sixth grade

Table of Contents

  • Lesson 1: Watching the Weather
  • Lesson 2: Air Temperature and Pressure
  • Lesson 3: Wind
  • Lesson 4: Invisible Water in the Air: Humidity
  • Lesson 5: Clouds and the Water Cycle
  • Lesson 6: Fog, Dew, and Precipitation
  • Lesson 7: Mapping Weather and Fronts
  • Lesson 8: Storms and Wild Weather
  • Lesson 9: Geography and Climate (2 Days)
  • Lesson 10: Climate Change
  • Final Project: Presenting My Weather and Climate (3 Days)

Summary of Skills

Moving Beyond the Page is based on state and national standards. These standards are covered in this unit.
  • Analyze evidence to explain observations, make inferences and predictions, and develop the relationship between evidence and explanation. (Science)
  • Analyze global wind, water, and air mass movements to determine their effects on local and global climate. (Science)
  • Collect data to provide evidence for how atmospheric conditions result in changes in weather. (Science)
  • Collect data to provide evidence for how the motions and complex interactions of air masses result in changes in weather conditions. (Science)
  • Compile and use weather data to establish a climate record and reveal any trends. (Science)
  • Conduct investigations to demonstrate an understanding of scientific inquiry. (Science)
  • Demonstrate that when fronts meet, cold air sinks and warm air rises. (Science)
  • Demonstrate the effects of greenhouse gases. (Science)
  • Describe and analyze the formation of various types of clouds and discuss their relation to weather systems. (Science)
  • Design and conduct investigations to demonstrate an understanding of scientific inquiry. (Science)
  • Determine and discuss how the following are interrelated: dew point, relative humidity, temperature. (Science)
  • Discover that when liquid water evaporates, it turns into water vapor in the air and can reappear as a liquid when cooled or as a solid if cooled below the freezing point of water. (Science)
  • Discuss and determine how cloud cover is affected by predictable patterns of weather. (Science)
  • Discuss and determine how the following are affected by predictable patterns of weather: precipitation, cloud cover, air pressure. (Science)
  • Discuss and determine how the following are affected by predictable patterns of weather: temperature, convection currents, air pressure. (Science)
  • Discuss and determine how the following are affected by predictable patterns of weather: temperature, wind direction and speed, convection currents, precipitation, cloud cover, air pressure. (Science)
  • Discuss and determine how the following are affected by predictable patterns of weather: wind direction and speed, convection currents. (Science)
  • Discuss and determine how the following are interrelated: temperature, convection currents, air pressure. (Science)
  • Discuss and determine how the following are interrelated: temperature, relative humidity, heat index. (Science)
  • Discuss and determine how the following are interrelated: temperature, wind direction and speed, convection currents, air pressure, dew point, relative humidity, heat index. (Science)
  • Discuss and determine how the following create predictable patterns of weather: wind direction and speed, convection currents. (Science)
  • Discuss and determine the influence of geography on weather and climate: mountains, sea breezes, water bodies/oceans. (Science)
  • Discuss and determine the influence of these factors on weather and climate: mountains, sea breezes, water bodies/oceans. (Science)
  • Examine evidence for the rise in global temperatures over the past century. (Science)
  • Explain how global atmospheric movement patterns affect local weather. (Science)
  • Investigate how wind affects temperature. (Science)
  • Investigate the formation of static electricity. (Science)
  • Investigate the water cycle, including the processes of evaporation, condensation, precipitation, and run-off. (Science)
  • Investigate the water cycle, including the processes of evaporation, condensation, precipitation, and runoff. (Science)
  • Know that the Earth's atmosphere exerts a pressure that decreases with distance above Earth's surface and that at any point it exerts this pressure equally in all directions. (Science)
  • Know that water vapor in the air moves from one place to another and can form fog or clouds, which are tiny droplets of water or ice, and can fall to Earth as rain, hail, sleet, or snow. (Science)
  • Know that water vapor in the air moves from one place to another and can reappear as a liquid when cooled (fog, clouds, dew, and rain), or as a solid if cooled below the freezing point of water (snow, hail, sleet). (Science)
  • Know that weather conditions are variable and can be predicted within probabilistic ranges. (Science)
  • Know that when liquid water evaporates, it turns into water vapor in the air. (Science)
  • Know the causes and effects of different types of severe weather. (Science)
  • Learn to read weather maps and data to predict local weather and know that weather forecasts depend on many variables. (Science)
  • Learn to read weather maps and data to predict local weather. (Science)
  • Measure relative humidity using a hygrometer. (Science)
  • Understand that lightning is a form of static electricity. (Science)
  • Use appropriate instruments and tools to collect weather data. (Science)
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