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Stories from Europe
Age 8-10: Concept 3 - Similarities and Differences: Unit 3

Explore traditional types of stories and read stories from three European countries — Ireland, Russia, and Denmark. Learn more about each country, and consider how each story reflects its country of origin.

This unit can be used independently, but it is designed to be used concurrently with the social studies unit Europe.

Prerequisites

  • Able to read and comprehend chapter books at a 4th or 5th grade reading level
  • Able to write an organized paragraph
  • Usually used by children in third or fourth grade

Table of Contents

  • Lesson 1: Tradition Stories (2 Days)
  • Lesson 2: Fiona's Luck (2 Days)
  • Lesson 3: The Sea King's Daughter (2 Days)
  • Lesson 4: The Snow Queen (4 Days)
  • Lesson 5: Comparing and Contrasting Stories
  • Final Project: Writing Your Own Story (4 Days)

Summary of Skills

Moving Beyond the Page is based on state and national standards. These standards are covered in this unit.
  • By the end of year, read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, in the grades 4–5 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. (Language Arts)
  • Compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated, including the difference between first- and third-person narrations. (Language Arts)
  • Demonstrate understanding of words by relating them to their opposites (antonyms) and to words with similar but not identical meanings (synonyms). (Language Arts)
  • Differentiate between contexts that call for formal English (e.g., presenting ideas) and situations where informal discourse is appropriate (e.g., small-group discussion). (Language Arts)
  • Explain events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text. (Language Arts)
  • Form and use prepositional phrases. (Language Arts)
  • Introduce a topic or text clearly, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure in which related ideas are grouped to support the writer's purpose. (Language Arts)
  • Make connections between the text of a story or drama and a visual or oral presentation of the text, identifying where each version reflects specific descriptions and directions in the text. (Language Arts)
  • Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally. (Language Arts)
  • Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Language Arts)
  • Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events. (Language Arts)
  • Read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, in the grades 4–5 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. (Language Arts)
  • Recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant information from print and digital sources; take notes and categorize information, and provide a list of sources. (Language Arts)
  • Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. (Language Arts)
  • Use a comma before a coordinating conjunction in a compound sentence. (Language Arts)
  • Use a comma to separate items in a series and to separate equal adjectives. (Language Arts)
  • Use concrete words and phrases and sensory details to convey experiences and events precisely. (Language Arts)
  • Use dialogue and description to develop experiences and events or show the responses of characters to situations. (Language Arts)
  • With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing. (Language Arts)
  • Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences. (Language Arts)
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