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Drama
High School 1: Concept 2 - Semester 2: Unit 4

In this unit, you will explore the world of theater by studying different genres of plays and learning the terms associated with plays. You will also learn how playwrights construct a script by analyzing elements of figurative language and character development. You will read two plays: A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry and Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare. For your final project, you will complete three creative mini-projects related to Romeo and Juliet.
 
 
 

Prerequisites

  • Able to read books and texts at a high school reading level
  • Experience writing a five-paragraph essay
  • Usually used by students in the 9th or 10th grade
  • Familiar with the conventions of poetry and short stories
  • Able to understand, interpret, and apply figurative language techniques in reading and writing
  • Some basic experience with creative writing

Table of Contents

  • Lesson 1: What Is Drama?
  • Lesson 2: How to Read Drama
  • Lesson 3: Life and Times
  • Lesson 4: A Raisin in the Sun (3 Days)
  • Lesson 5: Act II (3 Days)
  • Lesson 6: Act III
  • Lesson 7: Fences (2 Days)
  • Lesson 8: Shakespeare
  • Lesson 9: Romeo and Juliet (2 Days)
  • Lesson 10: Figurative Language (3 Days)
  • Lesson 11: Nuanced Meaning (2 Days)
  • Lesson 12: Time and Tension
  • Lesson 13: Tragic Hero (2 Days)
  • Lesson 14: Modern Retelling (2 Days)
  • Final Project: Drama (4 Days)
  • Semester Exam: Semester Exam (5 Days)

Summary of Skills

Moving Beyond the Page is based on state and national standards. These standards are covered in this unit.
  • Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression. (Language Arts)
  • Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate. (Language Arts)
  • Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature. (Language Arts)
  • Analyze how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific work (e.g., how Shakespeare treats a theme or topic from Ovid or the Bible or how a later author draws on a play by Shakespeare). (Language Arts)
  • Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise. (Language Arts)
  • Analyze how and why individuals, events, or ideas develop and interact over the course of a text. (Language Arts)
  • Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme. (Language Arts)
  • Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations. (Language Arts)
  • Analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different artistic mediums, including what is emphasized or absent in each treatment (e.g., Auden's "Musée des Beaux Arts" and Breughel's Landscape with the Fall of Icarus). (Language Arts)
  • Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and the whole. (Language Arts)
  • Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening. (Language Arts)
  • Apply the Reading standards to the following range of text types, with texts selected from a broad range of cultures and periods: Dramas — includes one-act and multi-act plays, both in written form and on film. (Language Arts)
  • By the end of grade 9, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 9-10 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. (Language Arts)
  • Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. (Language Arts)
  • Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning, its part of speech, or its etymology. (Language Arts)
  • Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. (Language Arts)
  • Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. (Language Arts)
  • Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. (Language Arts)
  • Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. (Language Arts)
  • Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text. (Language Arts)
  • Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text. (Language Arts)
  • Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 9-10 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies. (Language Arts)
  • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone). (Language Arts)
  • Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (Language Arts)
  • Identify and correctly use patterns of word changes that indicate different meanings or parts of speech (e.g., analyze, analysis, analytical; advocate, advocacy). (Language Arts)
  • Integrate and evaluate information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally. (Language Arts)
  • Interpret figures of speech (e.g., euphemism, oxymoron) in context and analyze their role in the text. (Language Arts)
  • Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest. (Language Arts)
  • Prepare for and participate effectively in a range of conversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. (Language Arts)
  • Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Language Arts)
  • Students in grades 6-12 apply the Reading standards to the following range of text types, with texts selected from a broad range of cultures and periods: Drama includes one-act and multi-act plays, both in written form and on film. (Language Arts)
  • Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word's position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase. (Language Arts)
  • Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters. (Language Arts)
  • Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary). (Language Arts)
  • Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. (Language Arts)
  • Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences. (Language Arts)
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