Shipping Times Are Long, But You Don't Have to Wait
Every hard-copy curriculum purchase now comes with complimentary online access. See our blog for up-to-date shipping timeframes.

Short Stories
High School 1: Concept 1 - Semester 1: Unit 2

In this unit, you will explore popular short stories and the literary devices that authors use to create them. These devices include irony, characterization, symbolism, and point of view. You will also learn how to analyze a short story and its main themes using textual evidence to support your claims. This unit features work by Edgar Allan Poe, Alice Walker, Langston Hughes, and Kurt Vonnegut. For the unit’s final project, you will plan, draft, and revise a short story of your own creation.
 
 

Prerequisites

  • Able to read books and texts at a high school reading level
  • Experience writing a five-paragraph essay
  • Usually used by students in the 9th or 10th grade
  • Familiar with the conventions of poetry and short stories
  • Able to understand, interpret, and apply figurative language techniques in reading and writing
  • Some basic experience with creative writing

Table of Contents

  • Lesson 1: The Gift of the Magi (2 Days)
  • Lesson 2: The Necklace
  • Lesson 3: Literary Response (2 Days)
  • Lesson 4: Characterization
  • Lesson 5: Edgar Allan Poe (2 Days)
  • Lesson 6: The Lottery
  • Lesson 7: Everyday Use (2 Days)
  • Lesson 8: Harrison Bergeron (2 Days)
  • Lesson 9: Dialogue
  • Final Project: Writing a Short Story (4 Days)

Summary of Skills

Moving Beyond the Page is based on state and national standards. These standards are covered in this unit.
  • Analyze how an author draws on and transforms outside material in a specific work (e.g., how Shakespeare treats a theme or topic from Ovid or the Bible or how a later author draws on a play by Shakespeare). (Language Arts)
  • Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme. (Language Arts)
  • Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take. (Language Arts)
  • Analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different artistic mediums, including what is emphasized or absent in each treatment (e.g., Auden's "Musée des Beaux Arts" and Breughel's Landscape with the Fall of Icarus). (Language Arts)
  • Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening. (Language Arts)
  • Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text. (Language Arts)
  • By the end of grade 9, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 9-10 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. (Language Arts)
  • Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. (Language Arts)
  • Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. (Language Arts)
  • Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. (Language Arts)
  • Determine a theme or central idea of a story and extensively analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text. (Language Arts)
  • Develop a topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience's knowledge of the topic. (Language Arts)
  • Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience. (Language Arts)
  • Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (Language Arts)
  • Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth progression of experiences or events. (Language Arts)
  • Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Language Arts)
  • Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative. (Language Arts)
  • Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text. (Language Arts)
  • Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole. (Language Arts)
  • Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters. (Language Arts)
  • Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the complexity of a topic. (Language Arts)
  • Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters. (Language Arts)
  • Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counter claims. (Language Arts)
  • Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. (Language Arts)
  • Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences. (Language Arts)
  • Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences. (Language Arts)
  • Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation, establishing one or multiple point of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth progression of experiences or events. (LA) (Science)
  • Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim and counter claims. (LA) (Science)
<-- go back