Chemical Change
Age 10-12: Concept 3 - Change: Unit 3

In this unit, you will learn about chemical and physical changes that affect the world around you and your own body. You will discover how digestion changes the food you eat into nutrients that your body can use, and you will determine if different parts of digestion involve physical changes or chemical ones.

Prerequisites

  • Able to read and comprehend novels at a late 6th or 7th grade reading level
  • Able to write multiple paragraphs on a topic
  • Familiar with the five-paragraph essay
  • Usually used by children in the fifth or sixth grade

Table of Contents

  • Lesson 1: Protons, Neutrons, and Electrons
  • Lesson 2: Elements, Compounds, and Mixtures
  • Lesson 3: Physical Changes (2 Days)
  • Lesson 4: States of Matter
  • Lesson 5: Chemical Changes (2 Days)
  • Lesson 6: Acids and Bases
  • Final Project: Your Laboratory, the Digestive System (4 Days)

Summary of Skills

Moving Beyond the Page is based on state and national standards. These standards are covered in this unit.
  • Demonstrate that some mixtures maintain the physical properties of their ingredients, such as iron filings and sand. (Science)
  • Distinguish between physical and chemical changes in matter in the digestive system. (Science)
  • Identify changes that can occur in the physical properties of the ingredients of solutions such as dissolving sugar in water, dissolving salt in water, or adding lemon juice to water. (Science)
  • Identify that organic compounds contain carbon and other elements such as hydrogen, oxygen, phosphorus, nitrogen, or sulfur. (Science)
  • Identify the formation of compounds by using the evidence of a possible chemical change such as a change in temperature. (Science)
  • Identify the formation of compounds by using the evidence of a possible chemical change such as color change. (Science)
  • Identify the formation of compounds by using the evidence of a possible chemical change such as production of a gas. (Science)
  • Identify the formation of compounds by using the evidence of a possible chemical change such as production of a precipitate. (Science)
  • Know all matter is made of atoms, which may combine to form molecules. (Science)
  • Know metals have properties in common and that some metals are pure elements; others, such as steel and brass, are composed of a combination of elemental metals. (Science)
  • Know properties of solid, liquid, and gaseous substances, such as sugar (C6H12O6), water (H2O), helium (He), oxygen (O2), nitrogen (N2), and carbon dioxide (CO2). (Science)
  • Know properties of solid, liquid, and gaseous substances, such as sugar, water, helium, oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide. (Science)
  • Know scientists have developed instruments that can create discrete images of atoms and molecules that show that the atoms and molecules often occur in well-ordered arrays. (Science)
  • Know that during chemical reactions, the atoms in the reactants rearrange to form products with different properties. (Science)
  • Know that the differences in chemical and physical properties of substances are used to separate mixtures and identify compounds. (Science)
  • Know the common properties of salts/bases, such as sodium chloride (NaCl), and acids. (Science)
  • Observe and measure characteristic properties of substances that remain constant such as boiling points and melting points. (Science)
  • Recognize how large molecules are broken down into smaller molecules, i.e., carbohydrates can be broken down into sugars. (Science)
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