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To Kill a Mockingbird
Age 12-14: Concept 2 - Semester 2: Unit 4

In this unit, you will read To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee, a critically acclaimed novel that deals with serious social issues such as rape and racial inequality. This coming-of-age story follows young Jean Louise Finch, also known as Scout, as she navigates life with the guidance of her father, Atticus Finch. Also in this unit, you will learn new vocabulary words and practice diagramming sentences. At the end of the unit, you will watch the movie To Kill A Mockingbird and give an oral presentation over the book.
by Kelly Kirk
 
by Kelly Kirk
 

Prerequisites

  • Able to read and comprehend novels at an 8th or 9th grade reading level
  • Able to write multiple paragraphs on a topic
  • Can write a five-paragraph essay
  • Usually used by children in the seventh or eighth grade

Table of Contents

  • Lesson 1: Historical Context
  • Lesson 2: Home and School
  • Lesson 3: The Mystery of Boo
  • Lesson 4: Snow and Fire
  • Lesson 5: Surprising Talent
  • Lesson 6: Separate
  • Lesson 7: A Moral Dilemma
  • Lesson 8: Identity
  • Lesson 9: Order in the Court
  • Lesson 10: Equal Rights?
  • Lesson 11: The Mockingbird
  • Lesson 12: Wise Words
  • Lesson 13: Text and Film
  • Final Project: Oral Book Presentation (3 Days)

Summary of Skills

Moving Beyond the Page is based on state and national standards. These standards are covered in this unit.
  • Analyze how differences in the points of view of the characters and the audience or reader (e.g., created through the use of dramatic irony) create such effects as suspense or humor. (Language Arts)
  • Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story or drama propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision. (Language Arts)
  • Analyze the extent to which a filmed or live production of a story or drama stays faithful to or departs from the text or script, evaluating the choices made by the director or actors. (Language Arts)
  • Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. (Language Arts)
  • Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. (Language Arts)
  • Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text. (Language Arts)
  • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts. (Language Arts)
  • Integrate multimedia and visual displays into presentations to clarify information, strengthen claims and evidence, and add interest. (Language Arts)
  • Make connections between works, self and related topics. (Language Arts)
  • Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with relevant evidence, sound valid reasoning, and well-chosen details; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation. (Language Arts)
  • Present oral responses to literature that interpret a reading and provide insight, connect responses to the writer's techniques and to specific textual references, draw supported inferences about the effects of a literary work on its audience, and support judgments through references to the text, other works, other authors, or personal knowledge. (Language Arts)
  • Produce a multimedia presentation involving text, graphics, images, and sound using available technology. (Language Arts)
  • Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Language Arts)
  • Support judgments through references to the text, other works, other authors, or to personal knowledge. (Language Arts)
  • Use a variety of sentence types, punctuating properly, and avoiding fragments and run-ons. (Language Arts)
  • Use phrases and clauses correctly, including proper punctuation (e.g. prepositional phrases, appositives, dependent and independent clauses). (Language Arts)
  • Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and present the relationships between information and ideas efficiently as well as to interact and collaborate with others. (Language Arts)
  • Write responses to literature that exhibit careful reading and insight in the interpretations, connect responses to the writer's techniques and to specific textual references, and draw supported inferences about the effects of a literary work on its audience. (Language Arts)
  • Write responses to literature that exhibit careful reading and insight in their interpretations; connect responses to the writer's techniques and to specific textual references; and draw supported inferences about the effects of a literary work on its audience. (Language Arts)
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