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Watership Down
Age 12-14: Concept 2 - Semester 2: Unit 2

In a world where rabbits take center stage, members of one warren must flee their home in search of a new life. Follow their adventures as they cross paths with other rabbit groups, memorable animals, and humans.

Explore the fantasy genre. Analyze foreshadowing, irony, and character conflict. Then try your own hand at developing a fantasy story.
by Kelly Kirk
 
by Kelly Kirk
 

Prerequisites

  • Able to read and comprehend novels at an 8th or 9th grade reading level
  • Able to write multiple paragraphs on a topic
  • Can write a five-paragraph essay
  • Usually used by children in the seventh or eighth grade

Table of Contents

  • Lesson 1: Preparing to Read
  • Lesson 2: Foreshadowing
  • Lesson 3: An Epic Journey
  • Lesson 4: Comparing Rabbits
  • Lesson 5: Quotes and Creatures
  • Lesson 6: Dramatic Irony
  • Lesson 7: Rabbit Societies
  • Lesson 8: Folktales and Fantasy
  • Lesson 9: Characters
  • Lesson 10: Setting
  • Lesson 11: Conflict and Escape
  • Lesson 12: Dramatic Enactment
  • Lesson 13: A Fantasy Story (3 Days)

Summary of Skills

Moving Beyond the Page is based on state and national standards. These standards are covered in this unit.
  • Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression. (Language Arts)
  • Analyze how a modern work of fiction draws on themes, patterns of events, or character types from myths, traditional stories, or religious works such as the Bible, including describing how the material is rendered new. (Language Arts)
  • Analyze how differences in the points of view of the characters and the audience or reader (e.g., created through the use of dramatic irony) create such effects as suspense or humor. (Language Arts)
  • Analyze the extent to which a filmed or live production of a story or drama stays faithful to or departs from the text or script, evaluating the choices made by the director or actors. (Language Arts)
  • Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. (Language Arts)
  • Compare and contrast the structure of two or more texts and analyze how the differing structure of each text contributes to its meaning and style. (Language Arts)
  • Conduct short research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question), drawing on several sources and generating additional related, focused questions that allow for multiple avenues of exploration. (Language Arts)
  • Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning or its part of speech. (Language Arts)
  • Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text. (Language Arts)
  • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts. (Language Arts)
  • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts. (Language Arts)
  • Distinguish among the connotations (associations) of words with similar denotations (definitions) (e.g. bullheaded, willful, firm, persistent, resolute). (Language Arts)
  • Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and point of view and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically. (Language Arts)
  • Identify common words or word parts from other languages that are used in written English (e.g., phenomenon, charisma, chorus, passe, flora, fauna). (Language Arts)
  • Integrate quantitative or technical information expressed in words in a text with a version of that information expressed visually (e.g., in a flowchart, diagram, model, graph, or table). (Language Arts)
  • Understand the most important points in the history of the English language and use common word origins to determine the historical influences on English word meanings. (Language Arts)
  • Use common, grade-appropriate Greek or Latin affixes and roots as clues to the meaning of a word (e.g., precede, recede, secede). (Language Arts)
  • Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence or paragraph; a word's position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase. (Language Arts)
  • Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening. (Language Arts)
  • Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary). (Language Arts)
  • With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed. (Language Arts)
  • Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences. (Language Arts)
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