The Hydrosphere
Age 11-13: Concept 1 - Semester 1: Unit 1

In this unit, you will investigate the properties and importance of water found throughout the Earth. Through reading, critical thinking, and hands-on activities, you will develop your understanding of the Earth's water, its traits, its distribution, and its importance to all living things.

You will also learn about pollution and be challenged to consider what you can do to conserve water and protect water quality.

Other Items You May Need

The Age 11-13 semester 1 science units require materials from the Semester 1 Science Kit.
$64.99 #743 Age 11-13 - Semester 1 - Science Kit

Prerequisites

  • Able to read and comprehend novels at a late 7th or 8th grade reading level
  • Able to write multiple paragraphs on a topic
  • Familiar with the five-paragraph essay

Table of Contents

  • Lesson 1: The Hydrosphere (2 Days)
  • Lesson 2: Water and Its Characteristics
  • Lesson 3: Water and Its Distribution
  • Lesson 4: Marine Ecosystems and Estuaries
  • Lesson 5: Turnover and Upwelling (2 Days)
  • Lesson 6: Challenges for Earth's Reservoirs
  • Lesson 7: Environmental Challenges
  • Lesson 8: Water Quality
  • Lesson 9: Turbidity
  • Lesson 10: Food Webs and Food Chains
  • Lesson 11: Water Quality and Algal Blooms
  • Lesson 12: Personal Water Conservation (2 Days)
  • Final Project: Steward of the Hydrosphere (2 Days)

Summary of Skills

Moving Beyond the Page is based on state and national standards. These standards are covered in this unit.
  • Use oral and written language to communicate findings. (Language Arts)
  • Analyze and evaluate information from a scientifically literate viewpoint by reading, hearing, and/or viewing scientific texts, articles, and events in the popular press. (Science)
  • Analyze evidence to explain observations, make inferences and predictions, and develop the relationship between evidence and explanation. (Science)
  • Analyze hydrospheric data over time to predict the health of a water system including turbidity. (Science)
  • Analyze hydrospheric data over time to predict the health of a water system, including dissolved oxygen. (Science)
  • Analyze the unique properties of water, including density. (Science)
  • Analyze the unique properties of water: polarity, cohesion, and surface tension. (Science)
  • Describe how humans affect the quality of water by looking at historical situations to see types of water issues. (SS) (Science)
  • Describe how humans affect the quality of water through economic trade-offs and local water issues. (SS) (Science)
  • Describe how humans affect the quality of water through possible effects of excess nutrients in freshwater reservoirs. (SS) (Science)
  • Describe how terrestrial and aquatic food webs are interconnected. (Science)
  • Evaluate evidence (such as marine ecosystems, upwelling, and turnover) that Earth's oceans are a reservoir of nutrients, minerals, dissolved gases, and life forms. (Science)
  • Evaluate evidence that Earth's oceans are a reservoir of nutrients, minerals, dissolved gases, and life forms such as in estuaries and marine ecosystems. (Science)
  • Experiment with variables. (Science)
  • Explain the structure of the hydrosphere including water distribution on Earth, local river basin, and local water availability. (Science)
  • Identify and create questions and hypotheses that can be answered through scientific investigations. (Science)
  • Observe, collect, organize, and analyze data. (Science)
  • Recognize that the good health of environments and organisms requires monitoring of the hydrosphere, water quality standards, methods of water treatment, maintaining safe water quality, and stewardship. (Science)
  • Use information systems to identify scientific needs, human needs, or problems that are subject to technological solution, as well as locate resources to obtain and test ideas. (Science)
  • Use mathematics such as measurement, data analysis, graphing, and prediction models to gather, organize, and present quantitative data resulting from scientific investigations. (Science)
  • Use technologies and information systems to research, disseminate findings to others, gather, visualize, and analyze data. (Science)
  • Describe how humans affect the quality of water by looking at historical situations to see types of water issues. (S) (Social Studies)
  • Describe how humans affect the quality of water through economic trade-offs and local water issues. (S) (Social Studies)
  • Describe how humans affect the quality of water through possible effects of excess nutrients in freshwater reservoirs. (S) (Social Studies)
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