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The Prince and the Bard
Age 11-13: Concept 2 - Semester 2: Unit 3

In this unit, you will be introduced to three classic works of literature; the book, The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupery, and two of William Shakespeare's plays. In the plays, A Midsummer Night's Dream and Romeo and Juliet, and in the book, you will discover common themes of love and friendship, and persuasion.

Prerequisites

  • Able to read and comprehend novels at a late 7th or 8th grade reading level
  • Able to write multiple paragraphs on a topic
  • Familiar with the five-paragraph essay

Table of Contents

  • Lesson 1: Introduction to The Little Prince
  • Lesson 2: Meeting the Little Prince
  • Lesson 3: The Flower and Other Planets
  • Lesson 4: Earth and Other Planets
  • Lesson 5: Making Friends on Earth
  • Lesson 6: Saying Goodbye
  • Lesson 7: Introduction to Shakespeare
  • Lesson 8: Beginning A Midsummer Night's Dream
  • Lesson 9: Puck's Pranks
  • Lesson 10: Dreams
  • Lesson 11: Watching the Play
  • Lesson 12: Tragic Love (2 Days)
  • Final Project: Love Letters (2 Days)

Summary of Skills

Moving Beyond the Page is based on state and national standards. These standards are covered in this unit.
  • Construct essays and presentations that respond to a given problem by proposing a solution that includes relevant details recognizing and/or creating an organizing structure appropriate to purpose, audience, and context. (Language Arts)
  • Explore and analyze the problem-solution process by studying problems and solutions within various texts and situations. (SS) (Language Arts)
  • Follow the steps for a persuasive essay: state the thesis or purpose, explain the situation, follow an organizational pattern appropriate to the type of composition. (Language Arts)
  • Identify, analyze, and critique persuasive techniques such as promises, dares, flattery, and glittering generalities. (Language Arts)
  • Offer persuasive evidence to validate arguments and conclusions as needed. (Language Arts)
  • Organize an interpretation around several clear ideas, premises, or images. (Language Arts)
  • Paraphrase the major ideas and supporting evidence in formal and informal presentations. (Language Arts)
  • Recognize and use ellipses to indicate omissions, interruptions, or incomplete statements. (Language Arts)
  • Recognize and use parentheses and brackets. (Language Arts)
  • Recognize and use parentheses. (Language Arts)
  • Recognize effective arguments in oral presentations and media messages. (SS) (Language Arts)
  • Summarize author's purpose and stance in oral presentations and media messages. (Language Arts)
  • Use comprehension skills to listen attentively to others in formal and informal settings. (Language Arts)
  • Use proper mechanics including italics and underlining for titles of books. (Language Arts)
  • Write expository compositions using description, explanation, comparison and contrast, problem and solution. (Language Arts)
  • Write responses to literature, developing an interpretation exhibiting careful reading, understanding, and insight. (Language Arts)
  • Distinguish between fact and opinion in oral presentations and media messages. (Social Studies)
  • Explore and analyze the problem-solution process by studying problems and solutions within various texts and situations. (LA) (Social Studies)
  • Recognize effective arguments in oral presentations and media messages. (LA) (Social Studies)
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