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Tales from the Middle Ages
Age 11-13: Concept 2 - Semester 2: Unit 2

Experience life in the Middle Ages through two Newbery Medal books. In The Midwife's Apprentice, an orphan girl who is struggling to survive gains confidence and bravery through her apprenticeship to a local midwife. Good Masters! Sweet Ladies! is a collection of monologues from medieval characters with very different lives and experiences.

This unit is designed to be used in conjunction with the science unit Light and the Eye and the social science unit The Middle Ages, but it can also be used as an independent literature unit.

Prerequisites

  • Able to read and comprehend novels at a late 7th or 8th grade reading level
  • Able to write multiple paragraphs on a topic
  • Familiar with the five-paragraph essay

Table of Contents

  • Lesson 1: Medieval Times
  • Lesson 2: Beetle
  • Lesson 3: Summer
  • Lesson 4: Special Delivery
  • Lesson 5: A Baby
  • Lesson 6: The Inn
  • Lesson 7: An Angel or a Saint
  • Lesson 8: Newborn Hope
  • Lesson 9: Cast of Characters
  • Lesson 10: Point of View
  • Lesson 11: Village Life
  • Lesson 12: Glassblowers, Tanners, and Snigglers
  • Final Project: Life in the Middle Ages Think-Tac-Toe (3 Days)

Summary of Skills

Moving Beyond the Page is based on state and national standards. These standards are covered in this unit.
  • Analyze different forms of point of view, including first person (Language Arts)
  • Analyze different forms of point of view. (Language Arts)
  • Analyze the connections of relationships between and among characters, ideas, concepts, and/or experiences. (Language Arts)
  • Analyze themes and central ideas in literature and other texts in relation to personal issues/experiences. (Language Arts)
  • Analyze, make inferences, and draw conclusions about the author's purpose in cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts. (Language Arts)
  • Contrast points of view (e.g., first and third person, limited and omniscient, subjective and objective) in narrative text and explain how they affect the overall theme of the work. (Language Arts)
  • Determine the meaning of unfamiliar vocabulary words using context clues. (Language Arts)
  • Develop interpretations exhibiting careful reading, understanding, and insight. (Language Arts)
  • Differentiate between the active and passive voice. (Language Arts)
  • Narrate an expressive account which creates a coherent organizing structure appropriate to purpose, audience, and context. (Language Arts)
  • Spell frequently misspelled words correctly (e.g., their, they're, there). (Language Arts)
  • Use a variety of complete sentences (e.g., simple, compound, complex) that include parallel structures and consistent tenses. (Language Arts)
  • Use a variety of complete sentences (e.g., simple, compound, complex) that include properly placed modifiers, correctly identified antecedents, parallel structures, and consistent tenses. (Language Arts)
  • Use a variety of complete sentences (e.g., simple, compound, complex) that include properly placed modifiers. (Language Arts)
  • Use a variety of complete sentences (e.g., simple, compound, complex). (Language Arts)
  • Use a variety of sentences correctly, punctuating them properly and avoiding fragments and run-ons. (Language Arts)
  • Use simple, compound, and complex sentences in writing. (Language Arts)
  • Use the active voice in writing. (Language Arts)
  • Write responses to literature and select a focus, an organizational structure, and a point of view, matching the purpose, message, and occasion. (Language Arts)
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