Greece and Rome
Age 11-13: Concept 2 - Semester 2: Unit 1

Many of the cultural traditions that began thousands of years ago in ancient Greece and Rome are still influential today. In this unit, you'll explore the history of these two civilizations, learn about their governments and cultures, and make connections between these ancient European civilizations and your own life today.

In your final project, you'll explore government, daily life, and culture through creative visual, performance-based, and written projects.

Other Items You May Need

The Age 11-13 social studies units utilize a Timeline of Ancient Civilization along with a stack of timeline cards to enhance your child's understanding of the chronology of historical events. Cards are color coded so your child can easily see and compare what was happening in different parts of the world at the same time.
$6.99 #780 Timeline of Ancient Civilization
$5.00 #781 Ancient Civilization Timeline Cards

Prerequisites

  • Able to read and comprehend novels at a late 7th or 8th grade reading level
  • Able to write multiple paragraphs on a topic
  • Familiar with the five-paragraph essay

Table of Contents

  • Lesson 1: Early Greece
  • Lesson 2: Archaic Greece
  • Lesson 3: Classical Greece
  • Lesson 4: Everyday Life in Ancient Greece (2 Days)
  • Lesson 5: Macedonia and the Hellenistic World
  • Lesson 6: Early Rome
  • Lesson 7: The Roman Republic
  • Lesson 8: The Roman Empire
  • Lesson 9: Everyday Life in Ancient Rome (2 Days)
  • Lesson 10: The End of the Empire
  • Final Project: A Greek and Roman Menu (3 Days)

Summary of Skills

Moving Beyond the Page is based on state and national standards. These standards are covered in this unit.
  • Analyze the causes and effects of the vast expansion and ultimate disintegration of the Roman Empire. (Social Studies)
  • Analyze the geographic, political, economic, religious, and social structures during the development of Rome. (Social Studies)
  • Analyze the geographic, political, economic, religious, and social structures of the early civilizations of Ancient Greece. (Social Studies)
  • Compare and contrast life in Athens and Sparta with an emphasis on their roles in the Persian and Peloponnesian Wars. (Social Studies)
  • Describe the circumstances that led to the spread of Christianity in Europe and other Roman territories. (Social Studies)
  • Describe the enduring contributions of important Greek figures in the arts and sciences (e.g., Hypatia, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Euclid, Thucydides). (Social Studies)
  • Describe the establishment by Constantine of the new capital in Constantinople and the development of the Byzantine Empire, with an emphasis on the consequences of the development of two distinct European civilizations, Eastern Orthodox and Roman Catholic, and their two distinct views on church-state relations. (Social Studies)
  • Describe the government of the Roman Republic and its significance (e.g., written constitution and tripartite government, checks and balances, civic duty). (Social Studies)
  • Discuss the connections between geography and the development of city-states in the region of the Aegean Sea, including patterns of trade and commerce among Greek city-states and within the wider Mediterranean region. (Social Studies)
  • Discuss the geographic borders of the empire at its height and the factors that threatened its territorial cohesion. (Social Studies)
  • Discuss the influence of Julius Caesar and Augustus in Rome's transition from republic to empire. (Social Studies)
  • Discuss the legacies of Roman art and architecture, technology and science, literature, language, and law. (Social Studies)
  • Explain the significance of Greek mythology to the everyday life of people in the region and how Greek literature continues to permeate our literature and language today, drawing from Greek mythology and epics, such as Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, and from Aesop's Fables. (Social Studies)
  • Identify the location and describe the rise of the Roman Republic, including the importance of such mythical and historical figures as Aeneas, Romulus and Remus, Cincinnatus, Julius Caesar, and Cicero. (Social Studies)
  • Identify the location of and the political and geographic reasons for the growth of Roman territories and expansion of the empire, including how the empire fostered economic growth through the use of currency and trade routes. (Social Studies)
  • Note the origins of Christianity in the Jewish Messianic prophecies, the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as described in the New Testament, and the contribution of St. Paul the Apostle to the definition and spread of Christian beliefs (e.g., belief in the Trinity, resurrection, salvation). (Social Studies)
  • Outline the founding, expansion, and political organization of the Persian Empire. (Social Studies)
  • State the key differences between Athenian, or direct, democracy and representative democracy. (Social Studies)
  • Study the early strengths and lasting contributions of Rome (e.g., significance of Roman citizenship; rights under Roman law; Roman art, architecture, engineering, and philosophy; preservation and transmission of Christianity) and its ultimate internal weaknesses (e.g., rise of autonomous military powers within the empire, undermining of citizenship by the growth of corruption and slavery, lack of education, and distribution of news). (Social Studies)
  • Trace the migration of Jews around the Mediterranean region and the effects of their conflict with the Romans, including the Romans' restrictions on their right to live in Jerusalem. (Social Studies)
  • Trace the rise of Alexander the Great and the spread of Greek culture eastward and into Egypt. (Social Studies)
  • Trace the transition from tyranny and oligarchy to early democratic forms of government and back to dictatorship in ancient Greece, including the significance of the invention of the idea of citizenship (e.g., from Pericles' Funeral Oration). (Social Studies)
  • Trace the transition from tyranny and oligarchy to early democratic forms of government and then back to dictatorship in ancient Greece, including the significance of the invention of the idea of citizenship (e.g., from Pericles' Funeral Oration). (Social Studies)
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