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The Tree That Time Built
Age 10-12: Concept 4 - Systems and Interaction: Unit 2

Dig into a fascinating poetry anthology described as "A celebration of nature, science, and imagination." This collection of poems includes contributions from many famous poets including Emily Dickinson, D.H. Lawrence, Walt Whitman, William Blake, and Langston Hughes. Explore figurative language techniques and a variety of forms of poetry. Develop an understanding of poetic license and imagery, recognizing the importance of word choice in writing poems. For the final project create a lapbook to showcase your own collection of poems that pay tribute to the natural world.

Prerequisites

  • Able to read and comprehend novels at a late 6th or 7th grade reading level
  • Able to write multiple paragraphs on a topic
  • Familiar with the five-paragraph essay
  • Usually used by children in the fifth or sixth grade

Table of Contents

  • Lesson 1: Fields
  • Lesson 2: The Sea
  • Lesson 3: Prehistoric
  • Lesson 4: Plants
  • Lesson 5: Amphibians and Reptiles
  • Lesson 6: Insects
  • Lesson 7: Birds
  • Lesson 8: Mammals
  • Lesson 9: Preservation (2 Days)
  • Final Project: Poetry Lapbook (3 Days)

Summary of Skills

Moving Beyond the Page is based on state and national standards. These standards are covered in this unit.
  • Analyze how poets use sound effects (e.g., alliteration and rhyme scheme) to reinforce meaning in poems. (Language Arts)
  • Analyze the effects of author's craft on the reader/viewer/listener. (Language Arts)
  • Analyze the use of rhetorical devices for intent and effect. (Language Arts)
  • Compare and contrast the stated or implied purposes of different authors writing on the same topic. (Language Arts)
  • Compose a variety of fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama using a variety of topics and formats. (Language Arts)
  • Define how tone or meaning is conveyed in poetry through word choice, figurative language, sentence structure, line length, punctuation, rhythm, repetition, and rhyme. (Language Arts)
  • Evaluate the author's use of various techniques to influence the reader's perspective. (Language Arts)
  • Examine how systems and patterns in nature can help us better understand the past. (Language Arts)
  • Explain how authors create meaning through stylistic elements and figurative language emphasizing the use of personification. (Language Arts)
  • Explain how authors create meaning through stylistic elements and figurative language. (Language Arts)
  • Identify the tone, mood, and emotion conveyed in oral communication. (Language Arts)
  • Interpret details from procedural text to complete a task, solve a problem, or perform procedures. (Language Arts)
  • Make connections within and between texts by recognizing similarities and differences based on a common lesson, theme, or message. (Language Arts)
  • Make inferences and draw conclusions about the author's purpose in cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts. (Language Arts)
  • Read, analyze, and interpret poetry. (Language Arts)
  • Recognize dashes and hyphens and understand the difference. (Language Arts)
  • Recognize how tone or meaning is conveyed in poetry through word choice, figurative language, sentence structure, line length, punctuation, rhythm, repetition, and rhyme. (Language Arts)
  • Respond to fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama using interpretive, critical, and evaluative processes. (Language Arts)
  • Use effective rate, volume, pitch, and tone, and align nonverbal elements to sustain audience. (Language Arts)
  • Use parentheses correctly in writing. (Language Arts)
  • Use parentheses, brackets, and ellipses (to indicate omissions and interruptions or incomplete statements). (Language Arts)
  • Use simple, compound, and compound-complex sentences. (Language Arts)
  • Write poems using (i) poetic techniques (e.g., alliteration, onomatopoeia); (ii) figurative language (e.g., similes, metaphors); and (iii) graphic elements (e.g., capital letters, line length) (Language Arts)
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