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Albert Einstein
Age 10-12: Concept 2 - Force and Power: Unit 2

In this unit, you will learn about Einstein’s life and personal relationships as well as his professional life. Facing many obstacles along the way, Einstein was able to change scientific thought through his incredible and mind-boggling discoveries. While Einstein was a flawed man in many areas of his life, he was not only a world-renowned scientist but also an important advocate for peace during some of the darkest days in our history.

Enjoy playing Rummy Roots, a fun card game that will help you learn and apply common Latin and Greek root words. These words help scientists better understand technical terms they encounter in their work. For your final project, you will create a biography scrapbook to highlight some of the major events and accomplishments that occurred over the course of Einstein’s life.

This unit can be used independently, but it is designed to be used in conjunction with the science unit Force and Motion.

Prerequisites

  • Able to read and comprehend novels at a late 6th or 7th grade reading level
  • Able to write multiple paragraphs on a topic
  • Familiar with the five-paragraph essay
  • Usually used by children in the fifth or sixth grade

Table of Contents

  • Lesson 1: Who Is Albert Einstein?
  • Lesson 2: Einstein, The Boy
  • Lesson 3: University Days and Beyond
  • Lesson 4: Research and Discovery (2 Days)
  • Lesson 5: The Professor
  • Lesson 6: Fame
  • Lesson 7: War (2 Days)
  • Lesson 8: Peace (2 Days)
  • Final Project: Biography Scrapbook (3 Days)

Summary of Skills

Moving Beyond the Page is based on state and national standards. These standards are covered in this unit.
  • Analyze the effect of the qualities of the character (such as courage or cowardice, ambition, or laziness) on the events and conflict in the story. (Language Arts)
  • Analyze, make inferences, and draw conclusions about expository text and provide evidence from text to support understanding. (Language Arts)
  • Conduct research (with assistance) from a variety of sources for assigned or self-selected projects (such as print and non-print texts, artifacts, people, libraries, databases, computer networks). (Language Arts)
  • Determine the meaning of grade-level academic English words derived from Latin and Greek roots. (Language Arts)
  • Distinguish between fact and opinion. (Language Arts)
  • Explain how authors create meaning through stylistic elements. (Language Arts)
  • Explain messages conveyed in various forms of media. (Language Arts)
  • Explore informational materials by generating questions. (Language Arts)
  • Identify language devices in biographies. (Language Arts)
  • Identify the speaker and recognize the difference between first-and third-person narration (for example, autobiography compared with biography). (Language Arts)
  • Integrate main idea and supporting details from multiple sources to expand understanding of texts. (Language Arts)
  • Know abstract, derived roots, and affixes from Greek and Latin and use this knowledge to analyze the meaning of complex words (such as controversial). (Language Arts)
  • Listen to and interpret a speaker's messages (both verbal and nonverbal) and ask questions to clarify the speaker's purpose or perspective. (Language Arts)
  • Make connections within and between texts by recognizing similarities and differences based on a common lesson, theme, or message. (Language Arts)
  • Make informed judgments about television, radio, video/film productions, other electronic media and/or print formats. (Language Arts)
  • Monitor comprehension for understanding of what is read, heard and/or viewed by analyzing the characteristics of expressive works. (Language Arts)
  • Monitor comprehension for understanding of what is read, heard, and/or viewed by analyzing the characteristics of expressive works. (Language Arts)
  • Monitor expository text for unknown words or words with novel meanings by using word, sentence, and paragraph clues to determine meaning. (Language Arts)
  • Produce work that follows the conventions of particular genres (such as essay, feature story, business letter). (Language Arts)
  • Read a variety of biographies. (Language Arts)
  • Read independently for a sustained period of time and summarize or paraphrase what the reading was about, maintaining meaning and logical order. (Language Arts)
  • Recognize and understand Greek roots (for example, tele, photo, graph, meter) and Latin roots (for example, spec, scrib, rupt, port, ject, dict). (Language Arts)
  • Recognize and understand Greek roots (for example, tele, photo, graph, meter) and Latin roots (for example, spec, scrib, rupt, port, ject, dict). (Language Arts)
  • Recognize how various techniques influence viewers' emotions. (Language Arts)
  • Speak clearly and to the point, using the conventions of language. (Language Arts)
  • Summarize significant events and details. (Language Arts)
  • Synthesize and make logical connections between ideas within a text and across two or three texts representing similar or different genres. (Language Arts)
  • Understand how to glean and use information in procedural texts and documents. (Language Arts)
  • Understand, make inferences, and draw conclusions about the varied structural patterns and features of literary nonfiction and provide evidence from text to support understanding. (Language Arts)
  • Use a variety of preliminary strategies to plan and organize the writing and speaking task considering purpose, audience, and timeline. (Language Arts)
  • Use comprehension skills to listen attentively to others in formal and informal settings. (Language Arts)
  • Use critical thinking skills and create criteria to evaluate print and non-print materials. (Language Arts)
  • Use metacognitive strategies independently and flexibly to monitor comprehension and extend vocabulary. (Language Arts)
  • Use oral and written language to evaluate information and ideas. (Language Arts)
  • Use simple, compound, and compound-complex sentences; use effective coordination and subordination of ideas to express complete thoughts. (Language Arts)
  • Use technology as a tool to enhance and/or publish a product. (Language Arts)
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