Slavery and the Civil War
Age 10-12: Concept 2 - Force and Power: Unit 1

In the middle of the nineteenth century, the issue of slavery divided the nation, eventually leading to the Civil War. The war was a devastating conflict that saw hundreds of thousands of casualties but ultimately affirmed that America would be a nation in which freedom would be assured for all. Explore the lives of enslaved people in antebellum America and the questions about slavery that divided the nation and led to Civil War. Carry your own haversack like a Civil War soldier and learn how families survived on the homefront. Explore the lives of Civil War leaders and the impact of Reconstruction. For your final project, create a museum exhibit or documentary film about the Civil War.

This unit can be used independently, but it is designed to be used concurrently with the literature unit for Bull Run.

Prerequisites

  • Able to read and comprehend novels at a late 6th or 7th grade reading level
  • Able to write multiple paragraphs on a topic
  • Familiar with the five-paragraph essay
  • Usually used by children in the fifth or sixth grade

Table of Contents

  • Lesson 1: Antebellum America (2 Days)
  • Lesson 2: Slavery (2 Days)
  • Lesson 3: Disunion and the Start of the Civil War
  • Lesson 4: Leadership and the Civil War
  • Lesson 5: The Wartime Experience (2 Days)
  • Lesson 6: Major Battles of the Civil War
  • Lesson 7: The Homefront Experience
  • Lesson 8: Gettysburg and Beyond
  • Lesson 9: End of War and Reconstruction
  • Final Project: Remembering the Civil War (2 Days)

Summary of Skills

Moving Beyond the Page is based on state and national standards. These standards are covered in this unit.
  • Analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing, contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations and predictions, and drawing inferences and conclusions. (Social Studies)
  • Analyze the political, economic, and social impact of Reconstruction and identify the reasons why Reconstruction came to an end. (Social Studies)
  • Analyze the significance of the Missouri Compromise (1820), the Kansas-Nebraska Act (1854), and the Lincoln-Douglas debates. (Social Studies)
  • Analyze the social and economic impact of the war. (Social Studies)
  • Compare and contrast conflicting interpretations of state and federal authority. (Social Studies)
  • Describe the agrarian economy in the South. (Social Studies)
  • Describe the causes and effects of the Civil War and explain the reasons for the involvement of different states in the Civil War. (Social Studies)
  • Describe the causes and effects of the Civil War. (Social Studies)
  • Describe the development of the agrarian economy in the South and discuss the significance of cotton and the cotton gin. (Social Studies)
  • Describe the political and military development of the Civil War and analyze their effect on the outcome of the war. (Social Studies)
  • Differentiate between, locate, and use primary and secondary sources. (Social Studies)
  • Discuss Abraham Lincoln and his significant writings and speeches and their relationship to the Declaration of Independence, such as the Gettysburg Address (1863) and the Emancipation Proclamation (1863). (Social Studies)
  • Discuss Abraham Lincoln and his significant writings and speeches and their relationship to the Declaration of Independence, such as the Gettysburg Address (1863) and the Emancipation Proclamation (1863). (Social Studies)
  • Evaluate the importance of the roles played by individuals at the state and national levels during the Civil War and Reconstruction period. (Social Studies)
  • Explain how industry and the mechanization of agriculture changed ways of life in America. (Social Studies)
  • Explain the reasons for and rights provided by the 13th, 14th, and 15th amendments to the U.S. Constitution. (Social Studies)
  • Identify and analyze the significance of the causes of secession from the Union. (Social Studies)
  • Identify changes in society resulting from the Industrial Revolution. (Social Studies)
  • Identify different points of view about an issue or topic. (Social Studies)
  • Identify the elements of frame of reference that influenced the participants in an event. (Social Studies)
  • Organize and interpret information in a variety of ways including graphs, charts, timelines, and maps. (Social Studies)
  • Study the skills and lives of leaders and soldiers on both sides of the war. (Social Studies)
  • Study the views and lives of leaders (e.g., Ulysses S. Grant, Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee) and soldiers on both sides of the war. (Social Studies)
  • Study the views and lives of leaders (e.g., Ulysses S. Grant, Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee) on both sides of the war. (Social Studies)
  • Trace the boundaries constituting the North and the South and identify the differences between agrarians and industrialists. (Social Studies)
  • Trace the origins and development of slavery; its effects on African Americans and on the region's political, economic, and cultural development; and identify the strategies that were tried to both overturn it and preserve it. (Social Studies)
  • Use appropriate mathematical skills to interpret social studies information such as maps or graphs. (Social Studies)
  • Use primary and secondary sources to discover information about United States history. (Social Studies)
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