Lesson 4: Animals Live and Grow

Activities

Activity 1: Habitats of Living Things

Materials: Crinkleroot's Guide to Knowing Animal Habitats by Jim Arnosky
In a previous lesson your child pointed out the plants and animals he recognized in the habitats found in Crinkleroot's Guide to Knowing Animal Habits. Today he will chart these living things.

To find the names of plants found in the habitat, go online and research "plants found in the ________ " (wetlands, woodlands, grasslands, drylands). You can list plants found in the book or you can list the names of plants you find in your online research.

For Option 1, your child will draw the animals and plants and you can label them for him. For Option 2, your child can write the names of the living things he recognizes from the book. The habitats are listed in the order in which they are explored in the book. Most habitats have multiple pages that show a variety of wildlife for each one.

Option 1

On the "Habitats of Living Things" (Option 1) pages, your child can draw pictures of plants and animals found in the habitats, and you can label each one.

Option 2

On the "Habitats of Living Things" (Option 2) pages, your child can write the names of the living things he recognizes. Many animals are labeled in the book. You can shorten the names of some of the animals for the page. For example, instead of writing "water moccasin," your child can just write "snake," or instead of "great blue heron," your child can just write "heron."

Activity 2: Food for Energy and Survival

Materials: Crinkleroot's Guide to Knowing Animal Habitats by Jim Arnosky, scissors
Ask your child to name the things animals need to live and grow (water, food, and shelter). Discuss how habitats provide all of these things for the organisms that live in them. An organism (living thing) that eats another organism is called a consumer. A living thing that is eaten by another organism is called an energy source.

Explain to your child that all living things need energy and that they get their energy from their food. Without food, organisms cannot function and will starve. Water is not enough to survive. Discuss that some animals eat plants, some eat other animals, and some eat both.

Look over the activity pages from Activity 1. Ask your child to analyze the living things he recorded for each habitat. Can he find one organism that provides food for another organism in the habitat?

Encourage him to find an example from each habitat of an organism that provides food for another organism in the habitat. Remind your child that the living thing that eats another organism is called the consumer, and the living thing that is eaten is the energy source. Your child can cut these out from his list and paste them on the "Food for Survival and Energy" activity pages. If he can't find a match on the previous activity pages, he can go back to the book and find an example or go online and draw or label the consumer and energy sources in the habitat boxes.

Activity 3: Shelter

Materials: scissors
Ask your child why shelter is important to an animal. Discuss how heat and Sun, as well as very cold conditions, can cause an animal to seek shelter. Shelter also helps animals protect themselves from predators. Ask your child to go through the Crinkleroot's Guide to Knowing Animal Habitats and look for examples of shelter. Ask your child if he can think of how animals use plants not just for food but also for shelter.

On the "Shelter" page, your child can cut out each animal and put it in the location that would provide the best shelter for the animal.